Author Archives: Sven Gronemeyer

About Sven Gronemeyer

Lebenslauf
Ab 1998 Studium der Altamerikanistik und Ethnologie, Vor- und Frühgeschichte und Ägyptologie an der Rheinischen Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn. 2004 Magister mit einer epigraphischen Studie der Inschriften von Tortuguero, Mexiko. Von 2011 bis 2014 Promotionsstipendiat an der La Trobe University Melbourne, 2015 Promotion mit einer Arbeit über die orthographischen Konventionen der Mayaschrift und die phonemische Rekonstruktion des Klassischen Maya. Von 2010 bis 2012 Mitarbeiter im Proyecto Arqueológico Tamarindito. Seit 2014 Vizepräsident von Wayeb (European Association of Mayanists). Honorary Associate der La Trobe University seit 2015. Preisträger 2015 der Nancy Millis Medal.
Publikationen
Die Kultur der Klassischen Maya. Epigraphisch interessieren vorrangig historiographische Aspekte und Systeme der politischen und territorialen Organisation, sowie typologische Untersuchungen des Schriftsystems. Linguistisch liegen die Schwerpunkte auf komparativen und quantitativen Methoden einer historischen Linguistik des Klassischen Maya, insbesondere in den Bereichen Phonologie und Morphologie.

Wissenschaft hautnah für Museumsbesucher

Speirer Zeitung

Forscher der Universität Bonn erfassen Maya-Hieroglyphen mit neuester Technologie im Historischen Museum der Pfalz. Im Historischen Museum der Pfalz erfassen derzeit Forscher der Universität Bonn, Abteilung für Altamerikanistik, mit modernster Technik originale Hieroglyphentexte der Mayakultur, die auf Exponaten in der Ausstellung „Maya – Das Rätsel der Königsstädte“ zu finden sind. Jeweils dienstags am 7. und 21. Februar sowie am 4. April können Ausstellungsbesucher von 10 bis 18 Uhr den Wissenschaftlern bei ihrer Arbeit über die Schulter blicken und Fragen stellen.

mehr…

Filling the Grid? More Evidence for the <t’a> Syllabogram

Research Note 4

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.20376/IDIOM-23665556.16.rn004.en

Sven Gronemeyer1,2

1 Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität, Bonn
2 La Trobe University, Melbourne

This epigraphic note1)This research paper abstains from indicating or reconstructing vowel complexity on the basis of supragraphematic vowel disharmony, as has been proposed in two studies (Houston, Stuart & Robertson 1998, Lacadena & Wichmann 2004). There are two main reasons for this approach: 1) although both proposals operate under similar premises, their conclusions are rather distinct; and 2) no consensus has yet been reached on the mechanisms of disharmonic spellings, resulting in alternative views on the reasons underlying the phenomenon of vowel disharmony (e.g. Kaufman 2003, Mora-Marín 2004, Gronemeyer 2014). We neither neglect previous research nor entirely dismiss the possibility of a quantitative Classic Mayan vowel system and its orthographic indication. Before the project has collected sufficient epigraphic data and can test previous proposals against the existing evidence or formulate new hypotheses, we prefer to pursue an unprejudiced approach in our epigraphic analysis and to be rather conservative, while also noting that the transcriptional spelling in one model may vary between authors. We therefore apply a broad transliteration and a narrow transcription, but only as far as sounds can be reconstructed using methods from historical linguistics. This last point particularly concerns the aspirated vowel nucleus, as in e.g., k’a[h]k’. reviews David Stuart’s proposal for a t’a syllabogram (Stuart 1998: 417; Bíró 2003: 2, Lacadena & Wichmann 2005: fn. 1) and enriches the evidence for his reading by providing more examples in different productive contexts.

The Initial Evidence from Ikil

In a written communication to fellow epigraphers in 1998, David Stuart identified a hitherto unrecognised and still unclassified grapheme on one of the two inscribed lintels from Structure 1 in Ikil, Yucatan. Each of these two lintels consists of 10 glyph blocks, and together they comprise a single, continuous text spanning two opposite doorways of the summit temple of Structure 1 (Figure 1a-b; Andrews & Stuart 1968: 73, figs. 1, 3, 7).

The glyph block in question (Figure 1c) is block B on Lintel 1. Based on context, Stuart proposed the reading nnt’a?-T501ba-T18yi, for t’ab?-ay-i “(s)he/it ascended”, representing a unique instance of syllabic substitution for the typical “step verb” T843T’AB?. The logogram T843 was first proposed as a dedicatory verb for ceramic vessels by Barbara MacLeod (1990: 342) because of its abundant occurrence in the PSS. Stuart (1998: 409-417) later also linked it to building dedications. The reading and translation “to go up, to rise, to ascend” was first proposed by David Stuart, Nikolai Grube and Elisabeth Wagner (cf. Wagner 1995, Schele & Looper 1996: 51), based on the grapheme’s use in other contexts of historical nature2)For example, compare the accounts of Bajlaj Chan K’awil seeking refuge in different places as mentioned on Dos Pilas Hieroglyphic Stairways 2 and 4 (cf. Guenter 2003), or its use in association with other warfare events or tribute scenes (Stuart 1998: 409-416). and correspondences in Ch’olan languages (Kaufman & Norman 1984: 133). However, clear phonemic support was lacking.

a
b
c

Figure 1. Ikil Structure 1 texts. a) West Room, Lintel 1; b) East Room, Lintel 2 (photos after Andrews & Stuart 1968, fig. 1); c) Ikil Lintel 1, block B (drawing by Sven Gronemeyer).

Stuart’s (1998: 417) idea of a full phonemic substitution is supported by the dedicatory nature of the Ikil text, which opens with a-ALAY-ya t’a?-ba-yi u-wa?-ya-bi-li (blocks A-C), alay t’ab?-ay-i-Ø u-way?-ab-il “here ascended the dormitory of …”, followed by the elaborate name phrase of a noble woman. Equivalent formulae with either the T843 “step verb” or the T1014 “God N verb” are attested elsewhere and are well known in Yucatan (Figure 2). However, this evidence does not yet prove a full syllabic substitution for one of these two logograms, as it draws on functional parallels alone.

a
b

Figure 2. Examples of dedicatory verbs following alay. a) Cacabbeec Lintel 1 (drawing by Daniel Graña-Behrens [2002: pl. 4]); b) Edzna Ball-court Sculpture (drawing by Sven Gronemeyer [Benavides & Gronemeyer 2005: fig. 2]).

Further Support by Phonemic Complementation

Stuart (1998: 416-417) furthermore cites the case of Uxmal Capstone 2 (Figure 3). In block C, he recognises the same shape with a dotted outline typical of the T843 “step verb”. This sign icon is the Late Classic representation of the footprint ascending a stairway that is more clearly visible in early forms (compare to Figure 2a). Although the main sign is again clearly T501ba, he considers the third sign to be a rendition of the very same supposed t’a? syllabogram visible on Ikil Lintel 1, an interpretation also followed here. Thus, we might be dealing in this instance with a full phonemic complementation.3)A similar instance may appear on Uxmal Ball-court Sculpture 1, block F (Graham 1992: 119), where we might have the bulbous part of the supposed t’a? sign on top of the “step verb”. However, this occurrence cannot be confirmed because of the block’s badly weathered state and the fracture in the middle. We also have a dedicatory statement here and can thus analyse blocks C-D as t’a?-T’AB?-ba u-tz’i-bV for t’ab?-a[y-i]-Ø u-tz’i[h]b, “it ascends its writing”.

Figure 3. Uxmal Capstone 2 (drawing by Frans Blom [1934: fig. 4]).

A hitherto unrecognised instance of the “step verb” provides further support for the proposal that the enigmatic grapheme in question might indeed be a t’a? syllabogram. An altar support looted from Piedras Negras or its vicinity in the late 19th century and now stored in the magazine of the Peabody Museum (Teufel 2004: 565) was documented by Maler (1901: 64) in 1899 in Ciudad del Carmen. The inscription is badly weathered, especially in its lower half.

a b

Figure 4. Piedras Negras Altar Support. a) Front Side (photo by Teobert Maler [1901: pl. 11]); b) Block A5b (drawing by Sven Gronemeyer).

In block A5b, we obviously encounter another instance of the T843 “step verb”, likely conflated with the yi sign indicating the mediopassive (cf. Houston 1997: 295-296, Houston, Robertson and Stuart 2000: 330). Above is a less clearly recognisable sign that bears resemblance to the examples from Ikil and Uxmal, although this should be verified by double-checking the original monuments. Based on these assumptions, we are likely dealing with t’a?-T’AB?°yi; however, the rest of the inscription does not further clarify the verb’s function, as only ya-ha-? ?-?-k’i is still recognisable from the subject.

The evidence brought forward thus far provides some supporting indications that the reading of the T843 “step verb” may thus indeed be T’AB and that the unclassified sign in question is likely the syllabogram t’a.

Another Context to Test the <t’a> Reading

To verify the t’a? reading, more examples must be found of productive readings in other contexts. Luckily, there is at least one more environment where the sign is used. There are three examples, and once more, these originate from Yucatan, making the suspected case from Piedras Negras the only one from the Late Classic in the Maya heartlands.

Again, we are dealing with dedicatory statements of carved texts that all have a very similar structure (Figure 5). With the other syllabograms being well-known, we can tentatively operate with the spelling bo-t’a?-ja. As the expression appears in a predicative position, T181ja clearly marks a derived intransitive verb; thus, we can assume that bot’ is the root and test it against the lexical and semantic evidence in the given hieroglyphic context.

Lexical evidence for bot’ as a transitive verb is extremely limited and originates exclusively from Yukatekan (Table 1); thus, the spelling must indicate a passive. Here, we are dealing with a Yukatekan vernacular form with typical Classic Mayan morphology, providing another attestation of diglossia.

YUK bot‘ magullar, levantar chichón (Barrera Vásquez 1980: 65)
YUK bot’a’an carne levantada a magullada de algun golpe (Barrera Vásquez 1980: 65)

Table 1. Linguistic evidence for bot’.

With its semantic range encompassing “to smash, to mash, to buckle, to dent, to make bumps”, the action of bot’ could very well apply to the context of dedication statements (Table 2).

a a-ALAY-ya PET-ta-ja bo-t’a?-ja tzi-tzi-li-le yu-xu-li-li-le u-k’a-li …
alay pet-aj-Ø boht’?-aj-Ø tzitz-il=e[’] y-uxul-il=e[’] u-k’al-Ø …
here round-INCH-3s.ABS dent.PASS-MOD.V.INTR dedicate-ABSTR=TOP 3s.ERG-carve-ABSTR=TOP 3s.ERG-bind-NMLS
here became round, was dented the dedicated, its carving, its bound …
b … a-ALAY-ya bo-t’a?-ja yu-xu-li-li u-k’a-li …
… alay boht’?-aj-Ø y-uxul-il u-k’al-Ø …
here dent.PASS-MOD.V.INTR 3s.ERG-carve-ABSTR 3s.ERG-bind-NMLS
here was dented its carving, its bound …
c bo-t’a?-ja yu-xu-li u-ja-yi ?-? …
boht’?-aj-Ø y-uxul-i[l] u-jay ? …
dent.PASS.MOD.V.INTR-3s.ABS 3s.ERG-carve-ABSTR 3s.ERG-clay.bowl
it was dented its carving, its clay bowl ? …

Table 2. Linguistic analysis of the three examples of bo-t’a?-ja. a) Xcalumkin Lintel 1 Stone I, blocks A-G; b) Jamb of unknown provenance in the Museo Amparo, blocks A3-B5; c) Ceramic vessel of unknown provenance in Dumbarton Oaks, blocks A1-B2.


a
b c

Figure 5. Examples of the suspected bo-t’a-ja spelling. a) Xcalumkin Lintel 1 Stone I, block C (photo by Hanns J. Prem, drawing by Sven Gronemeyer); b) Jamb of unknown provenance in the Museo Amparo, block B3 (photo by Karl Herbert Mayer, drawing by Christian Prager [Mayer 1995: pls. 233, 237]); c) Carved ceramic vessel of unknown provenance in Dumbarton Oaks (DO 114), block A1 (drawing by Sven Gronemeyer).

Clearly, the term refers to the process of carving out glyph blocks from the background. In all of these examples, the elevated glyph blocks are elaborated in a bas-relief within the text field, as made explicit by y-uxul(-il), “its carving” and further corroborated on Xcalumkin Lintel 1 Stone I by pet-aj, “it was made round”.4)The spelling yu-xu-li-li-le on Xcalumkin Lintel 1, blocks E-F provides an interesting case. Although the two li signs clearly indicate an –il abstractive (or possessive) suffix, I interpret the le sign as the topic marker =e’, discussed by Alfonso Lacadena and Søren Wichmann (2002: 287-288) in other instances as evidence for Yukatekan vernacular influence. The Xcalumkin example is an overspelling that, instead of simply applying -li-le, produces a highly analytical form using a shallow orthography. The same enclitic appears in in block D as well, likely spelling tzi-tzi-li-le for tzitz-il=e[’]. Yucatec has a variety of entries for tzitz, including “bendecir, rociar” and “escurrir el agua”, as well as tzitza’n “cosa esquinada” (Barrera Vásquez 1980: 862); Itza has tziitz “splash, flick water with fingers” (Hofling & Tesucún 1997: 629). Another related form could be Ch’orti’ tzitz “a sowing, a scattering“ (Wisdom 1950: 730). Although we cannot securely tie the Xcalumkin example semantically to the “besprinkling” of a text, it nevertheless seems likely that it represents a dedicatory context.

A graphematic argument can also be made in favour of the supposed t’a? sign in the spelling bot’? in this context, in addition to the evidence for its lexical and semantic productivity. Most passive spellings tend to alter any potential root harmonic spelling from CV1-CV1 to CV1-Ca in order to provide the vocalic onset for the –aj thematic suffix (Lacadena 2004: 166-167, Gronemeyer 2014: 251-253, 304-325).

Distinguishing the Possible <t’a> Sign from <o> Allographs

This proposal of a second context in which to apply the t’a? reading to produce a meaningful reading bot’ raises the question of graphic variability. In previous reading attempts (Lacadena 2012: 54, fn. 14), the grapheme was considered as a graphic variant of either T99o, T279o, T280o, or T296o; or T87TE’ because of its close resemblance to these signs (Figure 6).

a b c d e

Figure 6. Comparison of graphemes similar to the proposed sign. a) T99; b) T279; c) T280; d) T296; e) T87. All images from Thompson (1962).

Applying these correspondences to the aforementioned context would yield a root bo’, bo[h], or bo[j]. Of these possibilities, only boj “to nail, drill” may be a semantically viable option (cf. pCh *b’oj, “clavar, barrenar” [Kaufman & Norman 1984: 117]; CHT boho, “barrenar” [Morán 1695: 11]; boh, “golpe de madero hueco” [Barrera Vásquez 1983: 60]), showing some relationship to the affective verb baj “to hammer” (Kaufman & Norman 1984: 116, Zender 2010). Another related form is bo[j]te’ in the semantic domain “fence, hedge” (cf. Lacadena [2012: fn. 14] for lexical evidence), but none of these options seems particularly probable for graphematic, morphophonemic, and semantic reasons. Why would a scribe have then written bo-o-aj instead of bo-ja-ja or bo-jo-ja?

A brief comparison of the different graphemes in Figure 6 can further clarify why the reading bo-o-ja cannot be favoured. T279 and T280 are attested in many contexts as the syllabogram o (Figure 7), a pars pro toto derivation of the front feather of T1066o, the so-called O-Bird cited in the Ritual de los Bacabes (possibly also read O’ [cf. Fitzsimmons 2012]). Although the bulbous end and the row of circular elements are optional, the feather always features a crosshatched area at or near the tip. This feature is absent in all examples of the proposed t’a? sign.

a b c d

Figure 7. Examples of different T279 and T280 signs. a) ha-o-bo, Copan Temple 11, West Door South Panel, A4; b) MO’-o, Machaquila Structure 4, Fragment V, 3; c) o-ki-bi, Palenque Temple 19, Bench South Side, M7; d) o-OL-si, Yaxchilan Lintel 37, C7b. Drawings by Sven Gronemeyer.

In a late development, T99 appears as an o allograph in Yucatan, a pattern later preserved in the codices (Figure 8), where it diffuses in shape with T296. It consistently exhibits one bulbous end, a centre row of dots and a mirror-symmetrical array of lateral lines in its persistent part, thus still representing a feather. However, a cross-hatched area is absent.

a b c

Figure 8. Examples of different T99 signs. a) MO’-o-o, Codex Dresden 16c3, A1; b) o-chi-ya, Codex Madrid 102d2; c) K’U’-u-lu-o-to-ti, Chichen Itza Akab Dzib, Lintel Front, C2. Drawings by Sven Gronemeyer.

Although the t’a? sign bears the most graphic resemblance to T99, there are in fact significant differences. Taking a closer look, the elongated element of the former has a rather lobed outline and is not symmetrical, and the line of circles appears not to be on the central axis. These features are especially visible in the Xcalumkin example, and less elaborated in Ikil and the Museo Amparo monuments (see the photo, rather than drawing). These characteristics, together with the given contexts, clearly prove that the proposed t’a? sign constitues a distinct grapheme with a syllabic value different from the bird feather o.

Yet Another Context for the <t’a> Sign?

There is one instance of T99 where the grapheme could be read as t’a instead of the usual value o. This interpretation would contradict the principle of multiple syllabic readings for one sign (Zender 1999: 56); however, diagnostic features of two signs are amalgamated in other contexts, in a blurring of distinctions between signs also observable in several graphemes recorded at Chichen Itza.5)For example, compare the spelling of K’AK’-k’u-PAKAL-la on Chichen Itza Stela 1, C6. The spelling for PAKAL resembles more the T594 checkerboard sign from the name of GIII, rather than the standard T624a,b sign. An example of T624c, the tasselled shield outline with the checkerboard design, can for example be found on Lintel 4, F2 from the Temple of the Four Lintels.

a b

Figure 9. Chichen Itza, Temple of the Four Lintels (Str. 7B4), Lintel 2. a) Photo of the lintel (Bayer 1937: pl. 8c); b) drawing of block A8 by Sven Gronemeyer.

Block A8 of Lintel 2 of the Temple of the Four Lintels is the last constituent of a nominal phrase. Its main sign is the undeciphered crouched body sign T226 (not to be confused with T703, which has a penis in place of the head). On Tonina Monument 161, block L (Graham and Henderson 2006: 102), this sign appears suffixed by –ta-ja, indicating an inchoative derivation of a noun; thus, the sign can be classified as a logogram.

Considering the high percentage of syllabic spellings and the shallow orthography used in Chichen Itza because of the diglossia situation (cf. Lacadena 2008: 1, 18, Gronemeyer 2014: 472), it is likely that the other two signs in block A8 of Lintel 2 function as phonemic complements. When applying the proposed t’a value in this case, and also considering the eroded, but still recognisable li sign, we may propose the reading T’AL? for T226.

This relates to some interesting lexical evidence for a positional root in the Yukatekan branch: YUK t’al, “agonizante, que no se muere” and “asentado sin firmeza, ligeramente puesto” (Barrera Vásquez 1983: 832); YUK t’al, “stretch out, be in agony, unconscious” (Bricker et al. 1998: 288); ITZ t’äl, “sit” (Hofling & Tesucún 1997: 617). The representation of the crouched body would also relate to this possible reading. But as the Tonina case indicates, the root represented by this sign clearly was not positional in in this case.6)The context of the Tonina Monument 161, dedicated by K’inich Ich’ak Chapat on 9.14.18.14.12, 5 Eb’ 10 Yaxk’in (AD June 18, 730), is about a “fire-entering” in the tomb of K’inich Baknal Chahk (Martin & Grube 2008: 186-187). Applying the proposed T’AL? reading, we can interpret block K-P as follows: och[-i] k’a[h]k’ t’al-t-aj u-muk?-nal k’inich bak-nal cha[h]k k’uh po[po’] ajaw, “fire entered, he became seated in his tomb, K’inich Baknal Chahk, the Tonina-God-King.” This account could relate to a post-mortal treatment of the corpse, e.g. a bundling of the bones. Furthermore, in Classic Mayan, positional roots may blur with transitive verbs in their inflection (Wichmann 2002: 7-8).

However, arguing with one undeciphered sign to support another decipherment may quickly become circular. This excursus is thus nothing more than a thought experiment. And it is still far from certain that the context here indeed represents the putative t’a? sign, and not the regular T99o sign.

T66 as a Possible Allograph

Elisabeth Wagner (1995) also mentions the examples from Ikil and Uxmal in her discussion of T66 as another possible t’a syllabogram (Figure 10a). Part of her argument draws on the painted capstone from the so-called “Tomb of Unknown Location” (Figure 10b).

a b

Figure 10. a) T66 (Thompson 1962); b) Chichen Itza Painted Capstone (Beyer 1937: pl. 13a).

In block E, we find T66?-T501ba in a position and context that resembles that of Uxmal Capstone 2, which makes T66 a possible allograph of the t’a? sign discussed here, spelling t’ab?. Again, no mediopassive form is indicated, and the following ma-ka in block F is also ambiguous. Although it could be interpreted as an underspelled passive ma[h]k-a[j], interpreting these spellings as the nominalised forms t’ab? mak, “it is ascended, it is covered” would create a couplet structure. The codices provide other contexts for T66, but discussion of these would stray too far from the current case.

A short remark must also be made on sign shape. T66 is a tripartite grapheme, with each part made up of a circular and bulbous element that shows some compositional similarity to the t’a? sign discussed here. Either way, T66 could be a multiplication of the single t’a? sign, or the latter could be an abbreviated version of the former.7)Both strategies of sign manipulation are well attested with other syllabograms in the graphematic lexicon of Maya writing, e.g. T604k’u and T149k’u, or T93ch’a, T603ch’a and T634k’u.

Conclusions

The context of t’ab? for the original proposal of the putative t’a? syllable is potentially enhanced by another occurrence discussed in this note, in which it may function as a pre-posed phonemic complement. Although the Ikil example could be considered a full phonemic substitution, the Uxmal case would account for a full phonemic complementation, if the signs are indeed the same (acknowledging the inaccuracy of many of Blom’s glyph drawings). The latter example may also point to an allograph.

More support for the t’a? grapheme comes from the context of the proposed bot’ reading in several dedicatory phrases. These instances also provide a series of subgraphemic details that help to delimitate these graphs from other o signs and support the status of the t’a? form as a completely different syllabogram. There are potentially two additional cases, but these appear in the context of two still undeciphered logograms.

Yet we still lack conclusive evidence to add a t’a syllabogram to the grid without question mark, if strict standards are applied. Ideally, at least a third context for the sign under discussion should be found to fulfil the following premises: the sign occurs in contexts in which it 1) functions as a syllabogram, 2) proves to be distinct from the different o variants, 3) exhibits vowel harmony with known syllabograms, either within the root or with a following suffix, and 4) complements a deciphered logogram. Ideally, more evidence should be found outside Late and Post-Classic Yucatan. Nonetheless, except for the dubious case from Piedras Negras, the sign seems to be a late invention.

Acknowledgements

I would like to thank Nikolai Grube, Christian Prager, and Elisabeth Wagner for comments and suggestions on earlier drafts of this note. Mallory Matsumoto kindly corrected the English.

References

Andrews, E. Wyllys, and George E. Stuart
1968 The Ruins of Ikil, Yucatan, Mexico. Tulane University of Louisiana. Middle American Research Series. Publications 31(3): 69–80.
Barrera Vásquez, Alfredo
1980 Diccionario Maya. Maya-Español, Español-Maya. Ediciones Cordemex, Mérida.
Benavides C., Antonio, and Sven Gronemeyer
2005 A Ballgame Stone Ring Fragment from Edzna, Campeche. Mexicon 27(6): 107–108.
Beyer, Hermann
1937 Studies on the Inscriptions of Chichen Itza. Contributions to American Anthropology and History 4(21): 29–175. Carnegie Institution of Washington Publication 483.
Bíró, Péter
2003 The Inscriptions on Two Lintels of Ikil and the Realm of Ek’ B’ahlam. Electronic Document. Mesoweb.
Blom, Frans F.
1934 Short Summary of Recent Explorations in the Ruins of Uxmal, Yucatan. Proceedings of the International Congress of Americanists 24: 55–59.
Bricker, Victoria R., Eleuterio Po’ot Yah, Ofelia Dzul de Po’ot, and Anne S. Bradburn
1998 A Dictionary of the Maya Language as Spoken in Hocabá, Yucatán. University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City, UT.
Graham, Ian
1992 Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 4, Part 2: Uxmal. Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA.
Graham, Ian, and Lucia Henderson
2006 Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 9, Part 2: Tonina. Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA.
Graña-Behrens, Daniel
2002 Die Maya-Inschriften aus Nordwestyukatan, Mexiko. Unpublished PhD dissertation, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität, Bonn.
Gronemeyer, Sven
2014 The Orthographic Conventions of Maya Hieroglyphic Writing: Being a Contribution to the Phonemic Reconstruction of Classic Mayan. Unpublished PhD Dissertation, Department of Archaeology, La Trobe University, Melbourne.
Guenter, Stanley P.
2003 The Inscriptions of Dos Pilas Associated with B’ajlaj Chan K’awiil. Electronic Document. Mesoweb.
Houston, Stephen D.
1997 The Shifting Now: Aspect, Deixis and Narrative in Classic Maya Texts. American Anthropologist 99(2): 291–305.
Hofling, Charles A., and Félix Fernando Tesucún
1997 Itzaj Maya – Spanish – English Dictionary. University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City, UT.
Houston, Stephen D., David S. Stuart, and John S. Robertson
1998 Disharmony in Maya Hieroglyphic Writing: Linguistic Change and Continuity in Classic Society. In Anatomía de una Civilización: aproximaciones interdisciplinarias a la cultura maya, edited by Andrés Ciudad Ruiz, Yolanda Fernández, José Miguel García Campillo, Josefa Iglesia Ponce de Leon, Alfonso Lacadena García-Gallo, and Luis Sanz Castro, pp. 275–296. Publicaciones de la S.E.E.M. 4. Sociedad Española de Estudios Mayas, Madrid.
Kaufman, Terence
2003 A Preliminary Mayan Etymological Dictionary. Foundation for the Advancement of Mesoamerican Studies (FAMSI). http://www.famsi.org/reports/01051/pmed.pdf
Kaufman, Terence, and William Norman
1984 An Outline of Proto-Cholan Phonology, Morphology and Vocabulary. In Phoneticism in Mayan Hieroglyphic Writing, edited by John S. Justeson and Lyle Campbell, pp. 77–166. Institute for Mesoamerican Studies, State University of New York Publication 9. Institute for Mesoamerican Studies, Albany, NY.
Lacadena García-Gallo, Alfonso
2004 Passive Voice in Classic Mayan Texts: CV-h-C-aj and -n-aj Constructions. In The Linguistics of Maya Writing, edited by Søren Wichmann. University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City, UT.
2008 Regional Scribal Traditions: Methodological Implications for the Decipherment of Nahuatl Writing. The PARI Journal 8(4): 1–22.
2012 Syntactic Inversion (Hyperbaton) as a Literary Device in Maya Hieroglyphic Texts. In Parallel Worlds: Genre, Discourse, and Poetics in Contemporary, Colonial, and Classic Period Maya Literature, edited by Kerry Hull and Michael D. Carrasco, pp. 45–72. University Press of Colorado, Boulder, CO.
Lacadena García-Gallo, Alfonso, and Søren Wichmann
2002 The Distribution of Lowland Maya Languages in the Classic Period. In La organización social entre los mayas, edited by Vera Tiesler Blos, Rafael Cobos, and Marla Green Robertson, 2:pp. 275–319. Memoria de la Tercera Mesa Redonda de Palenque. Instituto Nacional de Anthropología e Historia, Méxcio, D.F.
2004 On the Representation of the Glottal Stop in Maya Writing. In The Linguistics of Maya Writing, edited by Søren Wichmann, pp. 100–164. University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City, UT.
2005 The Dynamics of Language in the Western Lowland Maya Region. In Art for Archaeology’s Sake: Material Culture and Style across the Disciplines, edited by Andrea Waters-Rist, Christine Cluney, Calla McNamee, and Larry Steinbrenner, pp. 32–48. Chacmool/The Archaeological Association of the University of Calgary, Calgary.
MacLeod, Barbara
1990 Deciphering the Primary Standard Sequence. Unpublished PhD dissertation, Department of Anthropology, University of Texas, Austin, TX.
Maler, Teobert
1901 Researches in the Central Portion of the Usumatsintla Valley: Report of Explorations for the Museum 1898-1900. Vol. 1. Memoirs of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University 2. Peabody Museum, Cambridge, MA.
Martin, Simon, and Nikolai Grube
2008 Chronicle of the Maya Kings and Queens: Deciphering the Dynasties of the Ancient Maya. Thames & Hudson, London.
Mayer, Karl Herbert
1995 Maya Monuments: Sculptures of Unknown Provenance, Supplement 4. Academic Publishers, Graz.
Mora-Marín, David F.
2004 Affixation Conventionalization Hypothesis: Explanation of Conventionalized Spellings in Mayan Writing. Chapel Hill, NC.
Morán, Francisco
1695 Arte en lengua Cholti que quiere decir lengua de milperos. Unpublished manuscript. American Philosophical Society Library, Philadelphia.
Schele, Linda, and Matthew G. Looper
1996 Notebook for the XXth Maya Hieroglyphic Workshop at Texas, March 9-10, 1996; Quiriguá and Copán. Department of Art and Art History, the College of Fine Arts, and the Institute of Latin American Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX.
Stuart, David
1998 “The Fire Enters his House”: Architecture and Ritual in Classic Maya Texts. In Function and Meaning in Classic Maya Architecture: A Symposium at Dumbarton Oaks, 7th and 8th October 1994, edited by Stephen D. Houston, pp. 373–425. Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, Washington, D.C.
Stuart, David, Stephen Houston, and John Robertson
2000 The Language of Classic Maya Inscriptions. Current Anthropology 41(3): 321–356.
Wagner, Elisabeth
1995 A Reading for T66. Unpublished Manuscript. Bonn.
Wichmann, Søren
2002 Hieroglyphic Evidence for the Historical Configuration of Eatern Ch’olan. Research Reports on Ancient Maya Writing 51. Center for Maya Research, Washington, D.C.
Wisdom, Charles
1950 Materials on the Chorti Language. Microfilm Collection of Manuscripts on Middle American Cultural Anthropology 28. University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.
Zender, Marc
1999 Diacritical Marks and Underspelling in the Classic Maya Script: Implications for Decipherment. Unpublished M.A. thesis, Department of Archaeology, University of Calgary, Calgary.
2010 Baj “Hammer” and Related Affective Verbs in Classic Maya. The PARI Journal 11(2): 1–16.

Footnotes   [ + ]

1. This research paper abstains from indicating or reconstructing vowel complexity on the basis of supragraphematic vowel disharmony, as has been proposed in two studies (Houston, Stuart & Robertson 1998, Lacadena & Wichmann 2004). There are two main reasons for this approach: 1) although both proposals operate under similar premises, their conclusions are rather distinct; and 2) no consensus has yet been reached on the mechanisms of disharmonic spellings, resulting in alternative views on the reasons underlying the phenomenon of vowel disharmony (e.g. Kaufman 2003, Mora-Marín 2004, Gronemeyer 2014). We neither neglect previous research nor entirely dismiss the possibility of a quantitative Classic Mayan vowel system and its orthographic indication. Before the project has collected sufficient epigraphic data and can test previous proposals against the existing evidence or formulate new hypotheses, we prefer to pursue an unprejudiced approach in our epigraphic analysis and to be rather conservative, while also noting that the transcriptional spelling in one model may vary between authors. We therefore apply a broad transliteration and a narrow transcription, but only as far as sounds can be reconstructed using methods from historical linguistics. This last point particularly concerns the aspirated vowel nucleus, as in e.g., k’a[h]k’.
2. For example, compare the accounts of Bajlaj Chan K’awil seeking refuge in different places as mentioned on Dos Pilas Hieroglyphic Stairways 2 and 4 (cf. Guenter 2003), or its use in association with other warfare events or tribute scenes (Stuart 1998: 409-416).
3. A similar instance may appear on Uxmal Ball-court Sculpture 1, block F (Graham 1992: 119), where we might have the bulbous part of the supposed t’a? sign on top of the “step verb”. However, this occurrence cannot be confirmed because of the block’s badly weathered state and the fracture in the middle.
4. The spelling yu-xu-li-li-le on Xcalumkin Lintel 1, blocks E-F provides an interesting case. Although the two li signs clearly indicate an –il abstractive (or possessive) suffix, I interpret the le sign as the topic marker =e’, discussed by Alfonso Lacadena and Søren Wichmann (2002: 287-288) in other instances as evidence for Yukatekan vernacular influence. The Xcalumkin example is an overspelling that, instead of simply applying -li-le, produces a highly analytical form using a shallow orthography. The same enclitic appears in in block D as well, likely spelling tzi-tzi-li-le for tzitz-il=e[’]. Yucatec has a variety of entries for tzitz, including “bendecir, rociar” and “escurrir el agua”, as well as tzitza’n “cosa esquinada” (Barrera Vásquez 1980: 862); Itza has tziitz “splash, flick water with fingers” (Hofling & Tesucún 1997: 629). Another related form could be Ch’orti’ tzitz “a sowing, a scattering“ (Wisdom 1950: 730). Although we cannot securely tie the Xcalumkin example semantically to the “besprinkling” of a text, it nevertheless seems likely that it represents a dedicatory context.
5. For example, compare the spelling of K’AK’-k’u-PAKAL-la on Chichen Itza Stela 1, C6. The spelling for PAKAL resembles more the T594 checkerboard sign from the name of GIII, rather than the standard T624a,b sign. An example of T624c, the tasselled shield outline with the checkerboard design, can for example be found on Lintel 4, F2 from the Temple of the Four Lintels.
6. The context of the Tonina Monument 161, dedicated by K’inich Ich’ak Chapat on 9.14.18.14.12, 5 Eb’ 10 Yaxk’in (AD June 18, 730), is about a “fire-entering” in the tomb of K’inich Baknal Chahk (Martin & Grube 2008: 186-187). Applying the proposed T’AL? reading, we can interpret block K-P as follows: och[-i] k’a[h]k’ t’al-t-aj u-muk?-nal k’inich bak-nal cha[h]k k’uh po[po’] ajaw, “fire entered, he became seated in his tomb, K’inich Baknal Chahk, the Tonina-God-King.” This account could relate to a post-mortal treatment of the corpse, e.g. a bundling of the bones. Furthermore, in Classic Mayan, positional roots may blur with transitive verbs in their inflection (Wichmann 2002: 7-8).
7. Both strategies of sign manipulation are well attested with other syllabograms in the graphematic lexicon of Maya writing, e.g. T604k’u and T149k’u, or T93ch’a, T603ch’a and T634k’u.

Of Codes, Glyphs and Kings

Conference Presentation

The project will deliver a presentation at the DiXiT conference „Digital Scholarly Editing: Theory, Practice, Methods“ to be held at the University of Antwerp, October 5-7, 2016.

Of Codes, Glyphs and Kings: Tasks, Limits and Approaches in the Encoding of Classic Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions

Christian Prager, Katja Diederichs, Nikolai Grube, Elisabeth Wagner (University of Bonn), Sven Gronemeyer (University of Bonn & La Trobe University), and Maximilian Brodhun, Franziska Diehr (University of Göttingen)

So far, no existing digital work environment can sufficiently represent the traditional epigraphic workflow ‘documentation, analysis, interpretation, and publication’ for texts written in complex writing systems; such as Egyptian hieroglyphs, cuneiform writing, or Classic Mayan. The project “Text Database and Dictionary of Classic Mayan” will transpose this workflow to a digital epigraphy, by the reuse and development of digital methods and tools in the Virtual Research Environment. Maya writing is a semi-deciphered logographic-syllabic system with approximately 10,000 text carriers discovered in sites throughout Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, and Honduras (300 B.C. to A.D. 1500). When designing the digital epigraphic work environment, the documentation of the current state of decipherment of the script and language must to be considered. The digital decoding of undeciphered scripts requires a machine readable corpus with annotated textual data which meet technical requirements for applying corpus and computational linguistic methods. To digitally encode texts or markup linguistic information, the annotation guidelines of the TEI (Text Encoding Initiative) have become a standard. The project will therefore investigate the usability of TEI, rather designed for marking up transcriptions of fully readable texts originally written linearly and in alphabetic writing systems. A linear transcription of Maya inscriptions alone cannot represent the original spelling or primary source in its entirety, as many potentially significant details remain undocumented. Marking up the original text and its structure is therefore of great importance, particularly for partially deciphered or undeciphered scripts. We identify this issue as a significant desideratum in the TEI epigraphic research by estimating the limits as well as restating requirements for encoding standards like TEI. Our paper will not only address the tasks and limits of encoding texts in XML/TEI, but also our approaches in the study and decipherment of Classic Mayan.

Graphemik des Klassischen Maya

Vortrag

Am 8. April 2016 hält das Projekt einen Vortrag im Rahmen der Tagung „Ägyptologische ‚Binsen‘-Weisheiten III: Formen und Funktionen von Edition und Paläographie altägyptischer Kursivschriften“ (vom 7.-9. April) an der Akademie der Wissenschaften und der Literatur Mainz. Der Titel des Vortrages ist „Graphemik des Klassischen Maya: Die digitale Dokumentation und Epigraphie eines nichtalphabetischen Schriftsystems“, die Autoren sind Christian Prager und Sven Gronemeyer. Eine Anmeldung zur Tagung ist über die Webseite des AKU-Projekts erforderlich.

Zusammenfassung

Die Hieroglyphenschrift der Maya ist das einzig autochtone, voll phonetische Schriftsystems der Amerikas. Es weist einen Zeichenbestand von rund 800 Graphemen auf, die auf insgesamt zirka 10,000 Inschriftenträgern zu zu finden sind, die zwischen 300 v.Chr. und 1500 n.Chr. datieren. Mit Hilfe des Maya-Kalenders lassen sich die meisten Inschriften auf den Tag genau datieren, wodurch sich Sprach- und Schriftstadien oder Varietäten bestimmen und die räumlichen und zeitlichen Dimension kartieren lassen. Die Texte enthalten überwiegend historische Inhalte über die Könige, die einen gottähnlichen Status besaßen und um die Vorherrschaft im Maya-Tiefland konkurrierten. Die systematische lautliche Entzifferung ihrer Botschaften gelang erst in diesem Jahrzehnt, ist aber bis heute nicht abgeschlossen: während die Inhalte der meisten Texte verständlich sind, wiedersetzen sich etwa 40% aller Grapheme noch einer phonetischen Lesung, so dass wir die Texte bisher nur zu 70% sprachlich lesen können. Ein weiteres Verständnisproblem ergibt sich, weil die Sprache der klassischen Maya nicht überliefert ist. Sie kann nur aus dem Vergleich der 30 heute noch gesprochenen Mayasprachen rekonstruiert werden. Vieles vom kulturellen Vokabular ist als Folge der europäischen Kolonisation verloren gegangen. Dennoch sind die Entzifferung der Hieroglyphentexte und die Rekonstruktion der in ihr enthaltenen Sprache die notwendige Voraussetzung für ein besseres Verständnis der Maya-Kultur, der Geschichte ihrer Königsdynastien und ihrer Religion überhaupt.

Das Projekt “Textdatenbank und Wörterbuch des Klassischen Maya” der Nordrhein-Westfälischen Akademie der Wissenschaften und der Künste verfolgt mehrere Ziele bei der Erschließung der hieroglyphischen Textzeugen, die eine Vielzahl von Herausforderungen technischer und fachwissenschaftlicher Natur stellen. Grundlage ist die Zusammenstellung aller Textträger in einer Metadatenontologie und eines Korpus aller Texte in maschinenlesbarer Form. Diese korpusbasierte Arbeitsweise erlaubt es, Morpheme räumlich und zeitlich zu verfolgen und sie im Kontext zu analysieren. Mit diesen Informationen kann ein Wörterbuch erstellt werden, welches auch die Originalschreibung und eine Konkordanz berücksichtigen kann. Ein großes Problem unserer Arbeit bleibt die Entzifferung im Prozess. Für die Analyse haben wir ein mehrstufiges Beschreibungs- und Analysemodell entwickelt, das auf der Grundlage von XML realisiert und die Vielschichtigkeit der Mayaschriftforschung abbildet. Neben Klassifikation und Transliteration der Zeichen, erfolgt die linguistische Analyse der Morpheme, wobei hier das Problem berücksichtigt werden muss, dass neue Ergebnisse on the fly ergänzt werden bzw. alternative Interpretationen zur Hypothesenprüfung erfasst werden müssen. Dies betrifft nicht nur phonetische oder semantische Lesungen, sondern auch die Isolierung neuer Grapheme in einem Zeichenkatalog, der derzeit in Arbeit ist. Wir möchten Ihnen mit unserem Vortrag einen Einblick in unsere Projektarbeit geben, Probleme unserer Forschung aufzeigen und Lösungen anbieten, die nicht nur für die Mayaschriftforschung, sondern auch für benachbarte Disziplinen von Interesse sein dürften.

Morphological Glossing of Mayan Languages under XML: Preliminary Results

Working Paper 4

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.20376/IDIOM-23665556.16.wp004.en

Frauke Sachse1 & Michael Dürr2

1 Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität, Bonn
2 Freie Universität, Berlin

Introduction

This paper summarises the results of a workshop that was held at the Department for the Anthropology of the Americas of the University of Bonn between 4-6 September 2014. The workshop was a joint initiative of the research project Textdatenbank und Wörterbuch des Klassischen Maya (TWKM = Text Database and Dictionary of Classic Mayan) and the research group developing the software application Tool for Systematic Annotation of Colonial K’iche’ (TSACK) and aimed at discussing and defining standardised conventions for the linguistic description and glossing of Mayan language forms under XML1)The participants of the workshop who contributed to the discussion and examples that are used in the present paper include in alphabetical order: Katja Diederichs, Sven Gronemeyer, Christian Prager, Elisabeth Wagner (for TWKM) as well as Michael Dürr, Christian W.R. Klingler and Frauke Sachse (for TSACK)..

Grammatical descriptions of Mayan languages exhibit a plethora of descriptive standards. Produced by different linguists of different backgrounds with different research objectives, they reflect the diverse theoretical orientations of the linguistic discipline, ranging from formal descriptions of the structural or generative type to prescriptive grammars for the use in language teaching. Functionally identical forms are found to be analysed and glossed rather differently, depending on the purpose of description or the theoretical model applied. Even edited volumes usually maintain the personal preferences of authors, which may result in the ‘third person singular ergative’ being variously glossed in one and the same volume as “3erg”, “3sE”, “3SE”, “3sgE”, or –following a common standard of distinguishing pronominal sets A (ergative) and B (absolutive)– as “3a”, “3sA”, “3sg.A”, “3SG.A”, “a3S”, “A3s”, “A3” and “A.3” (see Avelino 2011 among others). Although there are justifications for maintaining different conventions, these constitute a source of potential confusion; in the case of the just mentioned example the abbreviation, “A” might be mistaken for the equally common gloss of the absolutive pronoun. Few attempts have been made to compare and integrate this material and provide a standardised and generally applicable descriptive terminology that can help to analyse grammatical development in the Mayan language family.

Any attempt to make the data of different Mayan languages comparable requires the definition of set conventions for glossing and typological description. As a prerequisite to the analysis of Classic Mayan by systematic comparison with modern and historic languages of the Mayan family, the TWKM-project will need to decide on such conventions. By choosing conventions that other corpus projects on Mayan languages operating within the same XML-based environment can share, the data would become comparable and permit comprehensive analysis of semantic and grammatical structure across corpora in the TextGrid repositories. Thus, standardising the rules for glossing would create the necessary infrastructure for a network of Mayan language database projects within the TextGrid environment.

The aim of the workshop was to identify and discuss difficulties and problems in interlinear glossing of Mayan languages and use them as a basis for defining the conventions and rules of linguistic description under XML. The languages that were primarily focused on during the workshop, thus, included K’iche’ (colonial and modern), Ch’ol, Modern Yukatek and Classic Mayan. Accordingly, the following summary presents results that are only preliminary and are not yet meant as a defined standard, but as a basis for further discussion.

Basic premises of the XML environment

Linguistic glossing is dependent on its purpose. The conventions proposed and discussed in this paper take the respective objectives of the TWKM and TSACK projects into account and conform with the restrictions imposed by the XML environment of an annotated corpus.

The main objective of the TWKM project is to build a corpus-based dictionary of Classic Mayan. Using the virtual research environment TextGrid, all Classic Maya texts will be compiled in a digital corpus and annotated to create a comprehensive database of lexical entries and morphosyntactic forms and structures. The annotation process starts with the graphemic classification of hieroglyphic signs and needs to include the phonemic transcription of sign values and their morphemic transliteration into words. The transliterated texts are then morphologically analysed and glossed, which constitutes the basis for the translation of sentence structures and the individual lexemes, from which the dictionary is built. The annotation process is complex and requires the inclusion of multiple options on all levels. An exact XML-schema and the technological infrastructure are at this stage still under construction.

The Tool for Systematic Annotation of Colonial K’iche’ (TSACK) is being developed as a software that supports the semi-automated analysis and XML-annotation of language forms in colonial documents (see Sachse et al. 2015).2)TSACK was developed in a pilot study for a project on the lexicography of colonial K’iche’ that will be undertaken by the authors of this paper. The research was funded at the University of Bonn between October 2013 and September 2014 (Maria von Linden-Programm). The programming was carried out by Christian Klingler, who was imminently involved in the theoretical development of the software. The primary objective of the research project is to define XML-based standards for corpus-oriented documentation of colonial dictionaries of the Highland Mayan language K’iche’. Colonial dictionaries do not follow common orthographic standards and exhibit inconsistencies in semantic correspondences of K’iche’ and Spanisch entries. TSACK assists in the analysis of the orthography and speeds up the XML-annotation process, which allows for the processing of larger quantities of lexicographic data. There are plans to implement this tool into the TextGrid environment and further develop and adapt it for the annotation of colonial data from other Mayan languages, which would help in processing large amounts of language data and make them available for comparative analysis.

Both projects share the objective of building databases that will serve the lexico-semantic and grammatical analysis of Mayan language data. Accordingly, linguistic glossing conventions need to be adapted to this particular purpose.

Dictionaries consist of lexical entries, or lemmata, the basic forms of lexical words. Dictionary-building thus always requires lemmatisation, i.e. the definition of the basic lexical form. The process of lemmatisation is dependent on the typology of the language. Mayan languages are primarily agglutinating. To build a dictionary from a text corpus, the words in each text need to be broken down into their morphological parts to make the lexical stems and roots retrievable within the corpus. Each of the elements that can make up a word (root, lexical stem, derivational morphemes, grammatical morphemes) need to be glossed individually. While for most cases of glossing it would suffice to break complex forms down to the lemma (1a), the compilation of lexical databases for which TSACK is being developed requires the morphological analysis of each form down to the root (1b).

(1) Glossing of stems and roots

    K’iche’

  • k-in-b’aqir-ik
    INC-1s.ABS-become.thin-MOD.V.INTR
    ‘I become thin’
    
  • k-in-b’aq-ir-ik
    INC-1s.ABS-N:bone-INTRVZ.INCH-MOD.V.INTR
    ‘I become thin’
    

A lemma consists of a minimum of a root and can combine a root and one or more derivational morphemes. Each derivational morpheme derives a new lemma which is annotated accordingly. The distinction of grammatical and derivational morphology and the classification of lexical categories needs to be part of the annotation scheme, as shown in the following example of a K’iche’ form. Accordingly, lexical and derivational categories need to be glossed unambiguously.

(2) XML-annotation of the entry quinbakiric from the Anonymous Franciscan K’iche’ Dictionary:

<entry>
<kichee_entry>
 <word>
  <original_form xml:id="w1">quinbakiric</original_form>
  <ref target="w1" type="transliteration" status="certain">
   <gram_affix function="INC" affix_is="prefix">k</gram_affix>
   <gram_affix function="1s.ABS" affix_is="prefix">in</gram_affix>
    <lemma xml:id="l1" class="V.INTR">
     <lemma xml:id="l2" class="N">
      <root xml:id="r1" class="N">b'aq</root>
     </lemma>
     <der_affix function="INTRVZ.INCH" affix_is="suffix">ir</der_affix>
    </lemma>
    <gram_affix function="MOD.V.INTR" affix_is="suffix">ik</gram_affix>
   </ref>
   <ref target="l1" type="translation" status="certain">become.thin</ref>
   <ref target="l2" type="translation" status="certain">bone</ref>
   <ref target="l2" type="translation" status="certain">thin</ref>
   <ref target="r1" type="translation" status="certain">bone</ref>
 </word>
</kichee_entry>
</entry>

In the example, grammatical morphemes are glossed in green, derivational categories in blue, and lexical classes in red. The detailed annotation allows the rebuilding of both, root-based and stem-based glossing.

(3) Root-based and stem-based glossing of annotated example

original dictionary entry quinbakiric
transcription kinb’aqirik
morphological analysis (1) k-in-b’aq-ir-ik
gloss (1) INC1s.ABSN:boneINTRVZ.INCHMOD.V.INTR
morphological analysis (2) k-in-b’aqir-ik
gloss (2) INC1s.ABSV.INTR:become.thinMOD.V.INTR
translation ‘I become thin’

The annotation of Classic Mayan texts has special requirements. Morphological analysis and glossing are dependent on the phonemic transcription, the transliteration of syllabic sign values and ultimately the graphemic classification. As all of these processes imply a certain level of uncertainty, annotation needs to allow for multiple interpretations. Furthermore it needs to be borne in mind that lexical and morphological analysis, and thus glossing, of Classic Mayan is still a reconstructive process that draws on evidence from modern and colonial Mayan languages in order to identify the lexical roots, grammatical markers and functions of the language depicted by the hieroglyphic script. As illustrated in the following example (4), the exact morphological analysis is not always clear and alternative glossings need to be included and retained until the grammatical patterns are better understood. It is the aim of the TWKM project to corroborate or dismiss current reconstructions and hypotheses about Classic Maya grammar based on a large annotated corpus of inscriptions. The glossing of lexical and morphological forms in the Classic Maya corpus is therefore as much an analytical result as it is an analytical tool to test and verify formal as well as functional categories.

(4) Interdependence of reconstructive sign analysis and morphological glossing in Classic Mayan

sign chumwan
(Montgomery 2002: 166, Fig. 9-8)
classification (Thompson 1962) 644°19:130.116:126
transliteration CHUM-mu-wa-ni-ya
transcription chumwaniy
morphological analysis (1) chum-wan-ø=iy
gloss (1) POS:sittingINTRVZ3s.ABSANT
morphological analysis (2) chum-wan-iy-ø
gloss (2) POS:sittingINTRVZCOM3s.ABS
translation ‘he sat down’

A note on orthographic standards

Linguistic glossing is independent from the orthographic standard used to represent the object language that is being glossed. However, for the purpose of defining standard conventions for TWKM and TSACK a common orthography needs to be used. Since the early colonial times, various orthographies have been in use, generating a significant number of potentially ambiguous characters. While in most modern orthographies the grapheme <k> represents the non-glottalised velar stop /k/, earlier (including colonial) orthographies used it either to represent the glottalised velar stop /k’/ (colonial Yukatek) or for the non-glottalised uvular stop /q/ (colonial K’iche’).

The current paper employs the phoneme-based standard alphabet defined by the Academia de las Lenguas Mayas (1988) to represent the Mayan languages of Guatemala. With the exception of grapheme <x>, the characters, or letters, of the ALMG alphabet are unambiguous and also apply to most Mayan languages in Mexico. The common Mexican conventions of using <b> instead of <b’> and <ts>/<ts’> instead of <tz>/<tz’> are not followed in here.

The orthographic conventions are shown below in integrated inventories.

  Bilabial Alveolar Alveo-palatal Retroflex Palatal Velar Uvular Glottal
Stops
[- glottalised]
[+ glottalised]
[+ voiced]
 
p
p’
b’
 
t
t’
d’
 
ty*
ty’*
 
 
 
 
 
 
ky
ky’
 
 
k
k’
 
 
q
q’
 
 
 

 
Affricate
[+ glottalised]
  tz
tz’
ch
ch’
tx**
tx’**
       
Nasal m n ñ*          
Fricative   s x, xh** x**   j   h
Lateral   l            
Vibrant   r            
Glide w         y    
Notes:
* Alveopalatal ty, ty’ and ñ have not been defined in the ALMG alphabet, but have been added for Ch’ol (Mexico).
** Mamean and Q’anjob’alan only.
*** Apico-alveopalatal affricates (tch and tch’) and fricative (sh) have been excluded from this table, as they are restricted to a single variety of Mam (Todos Santos).

Table 1: Integrated consonant inventory of Mayan languages.

Vowel length is a distinctive feature in several Mayan languages, although the short vs. long distinction is quite often realised as a lax vs. tense articulation. According to the recommendations of the ALMG, vowel length will not be indicated for the K’iche’an languages.

In Modern Yukatek, tones a indicated by acute ( ´; = high) or gravis (`; = low) accent over the vocalic nucleus of a syllable.

  Front Central Back
  short long lax short long lax short long lax
High i ii ï     u uu ü
Mid e ee ë       o oo ö
Low       a aa ä      
Notes:
*For Ch’ol and Chontal (both Mexico), a high central short vowel <ɨ> has been added to the ALMG alphabet.

Table 2: Integrated vowel inventory of Mayan languages.

Adaptation of the Leipzig Glossing Rules

The standard for linguistic glossing and description of Mayan languages to be developed by the current initiative follows the rules and conventions laid out in the Leipzig Glossing Rules (LGR), which are here expanded and modified to meet the specific properties of Mayan languages and the constraints imposed by the given research objectives.

The definition of the LGR was a joint effort by Linguistic departments of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig and the University of Leipzig (see LGR: 1). The rules were defined in response to the lack of a common standard for linguistic glossing and the need for such typological conventions to facilitate cross-linguistic comparison. The descriptive and comparative research disseminated by the Department of Linguistics of the MPI in Leipzig, including the World Atlas of Language Structures (wals.info/), apply the LGR as a standard. The LGR were intended as a set of rules and standard conventions for the glossing of morphological categories in linguistic publications. The glossing of syntactic features has been deliberately excluded. The LGR cover the core of grammatical and functional categories and do not claim to be exhaustive; the optional need for defining and modifying the standard set of conventions is explicitly acknowledged (p. 1). A number of different initiatives have expanded the LGR. The main feature not included in the LGR are derivational categories. Since derivation is a basic principle of word formation in Mayan languages and thus essential to the analysis of lexical categories as it is required by the TWKM and TSACK projects, glosses for derivational categories need to be included.

One essential prerequisite of interlinear glossing set out in the LGR is that glosses encode functional meaning and grammatical properties of morphemes. Existing grammatical descriptions of Mayan languages do not generally observe this rule, instead morphemes are frequently glossed by their structural category or „grammatical function“ is defined based on the form of a morpheme and not its context. This is in particular the case, when only the structural properties of a morpheme are known, but the functional category is not understood.

The definition of glossing rules cannot be independent of linguistic description and functional categorisation. The analyses of morphological functions can however differ quite substantially. For instance, the Yukatek aspectual prefix k- has been variously identified as an incompletive (e.g. Smailus 1989), imperfective (e.g. Verhoeven 2007: 117) or habitual (Bricker 1998). Or the K’iche’ suffix –ik that marks intransitive verbs in final position of the clause has been categorised as a modal marker (e.g. Dürr 1987), a status suffix (Kaufman 1990:71), category suffix (= sufijo de categoría) (López Domingo 1997: 84), or simply a phrase final marker (Romero 2006). The definition of a common understanding of grammatical forms is therefore a prerequisite to systematic glossing. Comparative analysis of grammatical development in Mayan languages shows that functionally identical categories can be marked by structurally rather distinct elements. The historical development of elements, however, must not be entirely disregarded, when identifying functional categories. The present summary takes basic reflections on the typology of Mayan languages into account and discusses the analyses of linguistic features, where necessary. As indicated in the LGR, glossing rules cannot solve the problem of multiple analyses. Forms that can be analysed, and thus glossed, in multiple ways are a common feature in Mayan languages, e.g. Yukatek b’ak’il waaj which can be analysed as ‘meat-bread’ or ‘meaty bread’.

Basic glossing rules

The following basic rules for glossing of functional and semantic properties in Mayan languages are restricted to linguistic glossing on the morphological level, aspects of syntactic glossing are not taken into account at this stage. The rules are taken and expanded upon from the LGR.

Word Alignment and Separation of Morphemes

The LGRs define interlinear glosses to be left-aligned vertically and word by word (see LGR, Rule 1). Morphemes are separated by hyphen (see LGR, Rule 2). No distinction is being made between grammatical and derivational morphology, both use a ‘dash’ for hyphenation.

(5) Vertical word alignment and hyphenation

    K’iche’

  • k-e-war-ik 			ri 	ixoq-ib’
    INC-3p.ABS-sleep-MOD.V.INTR	ART	woman-PL
    ‘the women sleep’
    

If morphologically bound elements constitute distinct prosodic or phonological words, a hyphen and a single space may be used together in the language example, while the gloss treats the form as a single word (see LGR; Rule 2A).

(6) Prosodically separate units constituting a complex form

    Yukatek

  • k-u-	y-il-ik-ø
    INC-3s.ERG-3s.ERG-see-INC.V.TR-3s.ABS
    ‘s/he sees it’
    
  • Ch’ol

  • tzi’-	k’el-e-ø
    COM.3s.ERG-see-COM.V.TR-3s.ABS	
    ‘he saw it’
    

While affixes are separated by hyphens, clitic boundaries are generally marked by an equals sign = (see LGR, Rule 2). The definition of clitics and their differentiation from affixes are not necessarily straightforward in Mayan languages. Within the XML-annotation scheme, clitics will be treated like affixes, in that they are marked for grammatical function and structurally specified as “enclitics”.

(7) Prosodic units consisting of more than one element (including clitics)

    Ch’ol

  • wiñik-oñ=ku
    man-1s.PRED=ASS
    ‘I am a man’
    

While in the LGR reduplication is marked separately by a tilde ~, we treat it here like affixation. In Mayan languages, reduplicated elements generally have derivational or grammatical function and can therefore be treated as morphemes. Both, partial and full reduplication are common in Mayan.

(8) Reduplication

    Yukatek

  • le-letz’-kil
    [C1V1-V.INTR-ADVJZ]3)This line is added for explanation and not to be reproduced in the glossing.
    INTENS-*sparkle-ADJVZ
    ‘sparkling’
    
  • Ch’ol

  • woj-woj-ña
    [C1V1C2-ROOT-ADVLZ]
    INTENS-bark-ADVLZ
    ‘yapping’
    

Allomorphs and epenthetic segments

Many Mayan languages also have developed allomorphs for affixes that are sensitive to the vocalic or consonantal character of the adjacent syllable margin of the morpheme boundary. In the following example (9a) from K’iche’ the allomorphs of the second person singular possessive prefixes a- and aw- are both glossed as 2s.POSS. In example (b), k- and ka- are both glossed as INC.
(9) Allomorphs

    K’iche’

  • a-b’i’				vs.	aw-ochoch
    2s.POSS-name				2s.POSS-home
    ‘your name’				‘your home’
    
  • k-at-xaj-aw-ik			vs.	ka-ø-xajawik
    INC-2s.ABS-dance-AP-MOD.V.INTR 		INC-3s.ABS-dance-AP-MOD.V.INTR
    ‘you dance’				‘s/he dances’

In a number of Mayan languages clusters of vowels or consonants in specific morphological contexts are avoided by insertion of an epenthetic vowel or consonantal glide, e.g. y in Ch’ol. Epenthetic vowels or consonants do not carry a meaning of their own and are therefore not glossed as separate elements. Epenthetic segments occurring at a morpheme boundary are therefore assigned to the preceding or following morpheme and thus treated as allomorphs in the glossing. In the following example from Ch’ol, the second person singular absolutive suffix -ety is realised as -yety, when following a vowel. In both cases the morpheme is glossed as 2s.ABS.

(10) Epenthetic segments

    Ch’ol

  • tzi’- 	y-ɨk’-e-yety 
    COM.3s.ERG-3s.ERG-give-APPL-2s.ABS
    ‘s/he gave it to you’
    
  • mi’- 	y-ɨk’-e-ñ-ety 
    INC.3s.ERG-3s.ERG-give-APPL-INC.V.TR.D-2s.ABS
    ‘s/he gives it to you’
    

Category labels

The LGR define the use of only upper case letters for the glossing of grammatical category labels. This convention is followed with only one exception, which is the glossing of singular and plural in person categories as s and p. The LGR employ “SG” and “PL” to mark number in person categories. However, to avoid confusion with the nominal plural, which in some Western Mayan languages can be structurally and formally identical with the third person plural, a different gloss is chosen here.

If a morpheme corresponds to more than one “metalanguage element”, the individual glosses for these elements are separated by periods (see LGR, Rule 4). The LGR suggest further conventions to mark such “one-to-many correspondences”, which are however not adopted here.

Bound personal pronouns are labeled with the elements ‘grammatical person’ (e.g. 1s, 3p) and pronominal category (i.e. absolutive, ergative, possessive), separated by the period. Following an option under Rule 4 of the LGR, person and number are not separated by a period, i.e. 1s instead of 1.s.

(11) Elements in person categories

    Ch’ol

  • tzi’-	tzɨñsa-yob’
    COM.3s.ERG-die.CAUS-3p.ABS
    ‘s/he killed them’
    
  • K’iche’

  • nu-wuj
    1s.POSS-book
    'my book'
    

In some Western Mayan languages, aspectual markers and bound ergative pronouns have fused, creating portmanteau forms with multiple grammatical references that are separated by periods in the gloss, see e.g. Ch’ol tzi’ COM.3s.ERG (11a).

Most one-to-many correspondences in Mayan languages regard functional classes that are subdivided into more specific functional categories. For example, in K’iche’ modal suffixes that mark the verb category fall into different modal categories, which are specified after a period. The modal marker -ik occurs with intransitive roots and stems as is accordingly labelled as MOD.V.INTR (8a). The transitive stem tz’ib’a that is derived from the noun tz’ib’ ‘writing, script, letter’ is marked with the modal suffix -j for derived transitive verbs and accordingly glossed as MOD.V.TR.D (8b). Imperative verbs and verbs with incorporated directional verb take the same set of modal markers (i.e. -oq on intransitive and -a’ on transitive verbs), which are glossed for their respective grammatical function as MOD.IMP oder MOD.DIR (8c-d).

(12) Modal categories

    K’iche’

  • x-oj-war-ik
    COM-1p.ABS-sleep-MOD.V.INTR
    ‘we slept’
  • x-ø-in-tz’ib’-a-j
    COM-3s.ABS-1s.ERG-writing-TRVZ-MOD.V.TR.D
    ‘I wrote it’
  • ch-at-b’ix-o-n-oq
    IMP-2s.ABS-song-TRVZ-AP-MOD.IMP.V.INTR
    ‘sing!’
  • x-at-ul-inw-il-a’
    COM-2s.ABS-DIR:come-1s.ERG-see-MOD.DIR.V.TR
    ‘I came to see you’

Another set of grammatical categories which require the marking of more than one metalanguage elements are derivational operators that derive new lexical classes. The gloss specifies the class of derivation and the semantic function. Nominalisers (NMLZ), for instance, fall into different functional categories, such as agentives (AGT), abstractives (ABSTR), instrumentals (INSTR), verbal nouns (VN), etc. The functional specification of the derivation is added after a period.

(13) Derivational operators deriving new lexical classes

    K’iche’

  • kun-a-n-el
    N:medicine-TRVZ-AP-NMLZ.AGT
    ‘healer’
  • u-kem-ik
    3s.POSS-V.TR:weave-NMLZ.VN
    ‘weaving’
  • saq-ar-ik
    ADJ:white-INTRVZ.INCH-MOD.V.INTR
    ‘turn white/bright’

Derivational operators not deriving a new lexical class are not specified as derivations and just labeled by function.

(14) Derivational operators not deriving new class

    K’iche’

  • aj-chak
    AGT-N:work
    ‘worker’
  • aq’ab’-al
    N:night-ABSTR
    ‘darkness’
  • saq-soj
    ADJ:white-MODER
    ‘moderately white’

Derivations with zero-marking.
(15) Derivations with zero-marking

    K’iche’

  • saq-ø
    ADJ:white-NMLZ
    ‘light’
  • Yukatek

  • k-in-tz’ú’utz’-ø-ik-ø
    INC-1s.ERG-N:kiss-TRVZ-INC.V.TR-3s.ABS
    ‘I kiss him/her’

Linguistic descriptions of Mayan languages often specify the derivational basis of a derivational operator in a gloss. For example, “INTRVZ.POS” for intransitivisers from positional roots. However, since the root/stem that functions as the derivational basis is glossed in the XML-annotation scheme for its lexical category, the overspecification is not necessary and therefore generally omitted.

(16) Overspecification of lexical basis in derivational glosses

    Classic Mayan

  • chum-wan-ø=iy 				→	chum-wan-ø=iy
    POS:sitting-INTRVZ.POS-3s.ABS=ANT 		POS:sitting-INTRVZ-3s.ABS=ANT
    ‘s/he sat down’ 				‘s/he sat down’
    

Semantic labeling of lexical categories

The meaning of lexical categories is glossed in English. According to the LGR, the lexical category label is not reproduced in the gloss. The XML-annotation contains that information. Multiple meanings of a root or stem are likewise annotated in the XML-scheme, however, the gloss only contains the core meaning most applicable in the context.
(17) Semantic labeling of lexical categories

    K’iche’

  • aj-q’ij			or:	aj-q’ij
    AGT-day				AGT-N:day
    ‘diviner = day-er’		‘diviner = day-er’
    
<lemma xml:id="l1" class="N">q’ij</lemma>
 <ref target="l1" type="translation">sun</ref>
 <ref target="l1" type="translation">day</ref>
 <ref target="l1" type="translation">heat</ref>

If the translation of the lemma or root contains more than one lexical element, these are separated by a period.

(18) Semantic glosses consisting of more than one element

    Ch’ol

  • tza’ 	jul-i-ø 				
    COM 	arrive.here-COM.V.INTR-3s.ABS
    ‘she arrived here’
  • tza’ 	k’ot-i-ø
    COM 	arrive.elsewhere-COM.V.INTR-3s.ABS
    ‘she arrived there’

The meanings of some verbs are formed with directionals accompanying the verb. The lexical meaning is not glossed, but expressed through the translation.

(19) Complex semantics of verbs accompanied by directionals

    K’iche’

  • k-ø-u-k’am			uloq
    INC-3s.ABS-3s.ERG-receive	DIR:towards.speaker
    ‘he brings it’
    
  • k-ø-u-k’am			ub’ik
    INC-3s.ABS-3s.ERG-receive	DIR:away.from.speaker
    ‘he takes it’
    
  • Ch’ol

  • wol-ix 		a-ch’ɨm-ø 		majl-el 
    PROG-already 	2s.ERG-take-3s.ABS 	DIR:place.of.addressee-DIR.V.INTR
    ‘you are already taking it away
  • wol-ix 		a-ch’ɨm-ø 		sujt-el 
    PROG-already 	2s.ERG-take-3s.ABS 	DIR:place.away.from.addressee-DIR.V.INTR
    ‘you are already taking it home

In lexicalised noun phrases or lexicalised predicative expressions that consist of a verb and a specific noun in the function of direct object or subject the lexical annotation is solved under XML, but not considered in the gloss.

(20) Lexicalised phrases

    Ch’ol

  • tyoj-ø			i-pusik’al	wiñik
    POS:be.straight-3s.ABS	3s.ERG-heart	man
    ‘straight is the heart of the man’
    “the man is honest”
    

When the meaning of lexical roots is not known, they are glossed with “?”.

(21) Lexical roots with unknown meaning

    K’iche’

  • u-mop-il
    3s.POSS-?-ABSTR/RELZ
    ‘budding (of flowers)’
    

When compounds are only in part semantically transparent, the intransparent part is glossed with “?”. The meaning of the compound as a lemma is annotated in the XML-scheme and can be retrieved.

(22) Compounds with semantically intransparent parts

    Ch’ol

  • i-b’oj-tye’-lel 	 	i-b’ojtye’-lel
    3s.POSS-?-wood-RELZ 	 	3s.POSS-pole.wall-RELZ
    ‘his wall’		 	‘his wall’
    

Derived stems that have lexicalised by undergoing phonological change and are not morphologically transparent to the speaker are glossed with the semantic gloss of the root and the gloss of the derivational category separated by a period. Segmentable morphology is always glossed, even if derivations are non-productive.

(23) Glossing of non-segmentable morphology

    Ch’ol

  • tzɨñsa-ñ 			but:	chɨm-sa-ñ		
    die.CAUS-MOD.V.TR.D			die-TRVZ.CAUS-MOD.V.TR.D
    ‘kill’					‘kill’
    
  • otzɨ-b’e-ñ			but:	och-sa-b’e-ñ	
    enter.CAUS-APPL-MOD.V.TR.D 		enter-TRVZ.CAUS-APPL-MOD.V.TR.D
    ‘put’					‘put’
    

When grammatical morphemes have grammaticalised as part of the verb stem and are non-segmentable, the semantic gloss of the lexical stem and the grammatical category are separated by a period.

(24) Non-segementable categories

    Ch’ol

  • che’eñ		but:	che’-ob’
    say.3s.ABS		say-3p.ABS
    ‘he says’		‘they say’
    

Non-overt elements

Non-overt elements are generally marked with ø, if they form part of a paradigm. All Mayan languages mark the third person singular absolutive as zero.

(25) Non-overt elements

    K’iche’

  • x-ø-u-b’i-j
    COM-3s.ABS-3s.ERG-say-MOD.V.TR.D
    ‘s/he said it’
    
  • ø=winaq
    3s.ABS=human
    ‘s/he is human’
    

Bipartite elements

No examples of bipartite lexemes have been analysed in Mayan languages. Bipartite grammatical morphemes are however an attested feature and marked by repetition of the gloss.

(26) Bipartite elements

    Yukatek

  • x-tzaj-ab’
    INSTR-fry-INSTR
    ‘instrument for frying = pan’
    

Infixation and stem changes

Infixes are not marked following the LGR conventions as , since this would not only interfere with XML-annotation using -tags, but also complicate searching for the lexical root. In these cases, the stem is glossed by meaning and grammatical function and the root meaning is inserted as a separate reference into the annotation scheme. Infixation is for instance attested in a nominalisation process in Tzeltal, where h is inserted after the root vowel of transitive stems.4)“As expected, there are also infixes that occur before the final element of their hosts. In the Mayan language Tzeltal, a group of numeral classifiers is derived from verbs by infixation of h before the final consonant (when the latter is a stop or an affricate; in all other cases, h is deleted; see Kaufman 1971). Examples of this phenomenon include the following: huht ‚holes‘, from hut ‚be perforated‘; lihk ‚ropes, cords‘, from lik ‚carry‘, and peht ‚handfuls of wood‘, from pet ‚embrace (below the arms)‘.“ The following example gives both the gloss and the XML-annotation with the separate reference to the root.

(27) Infixation

    Tzeltal

  • huht
    perforate.NMLZ
    ‘hole’
    
<lemma xml:id="l1" class="V.TR.NMLZ">huht</lemma>
 <ref target="l1" type="translation">hole</ref>
 <ref target="l1" type="root" function="V.TR" translation="perforate">hut</ref>

The same rule applies to grammatical changes of stems in the formation of passive and antipassive, which is a common feature in some Mayan languages. For example:

(28) Passive and antipassive stem changes

    Yukatek

  • k-u-ko’on-ol 
    HAB-3s.ERG-sell.PASS-INC.V.INTR
    ‘it is sold’
    
  • Ch’ol

  • tza’ 	mɨjk-i-ø
    COM	cover.PASS-COM.V.INTR-3s.ABS
    ‘s/he was covered (wrapped, hidden)’
    
<lemma xml:id="l1" class="V.INTR.PASS">ko’on</lemma>
 <ref target="l1" type="translation">be.sold</ref>
 <ref target="l1" type="root" function="V.TR" translation="sell">kon</ref>

<lemma xml:id="l1" class="V.INTR.PASS">mɨjk</lemma>
 <ref target="l1" type="translation">be.covered</ref>
 <ref target="l1" type="root" function="V.TR" translation="cover">mɨk</ref>

Incorporation of verbs and adverbs

In several Mayan languages, adverbial particles can be incorporated into the verb structure. In Western Mayan languages, such adverbials occur between the aspect- and ergative-markers. In the glossing, these adverbials are treated as affixes and separated by hyphens. In the Eastern Mayan language K’iche’, the occurrence of such adverbs is only attested with incorporated directionals and indicates separate prosodic forms (30b).

(29) Incorporation of adverbs

    Ch’ol

  • tza’-ix-ab’i		i-k’uñ-chuk-u-ø-yob’
    COM-already-REPRT	3p.ERG-ADV:finally-capture-COM.V.TR-3s.ABS-3.PL
    ‘they finally captured him’
    

(30) Incorporation of directionals and adverbs

    K’iche’

  • x-in-ul-r-il-a’
    COM-1s.ABS-DIR:come-3s.ERG-see-MOD.DIR.V.TR
    ‘he came to see you’
    
  • x-ø-b’e-k’u-ya’-oq
    COM-3s.ABS-DIR:go-ADV:then-give.PASS-MOD.DIR.V.INTR
    ‘s/he then went to be given’
    

Comments on the glossing of selected functional categories

The following section summarises the suggestions for some glossing conventions that were discussed during the workshop. The selection includes cases that require particular comment. The argument does not claim to be comprehensive in neither of the cases.

Grammatical relations

Although the present paper does not treat the glossing of syntactic features, the following abbreviations have been reserved to mark grammatical relations. The nomenclature follows Dixon (1994) and part of the general LGR.

S = subject of intransitive predicate
A = agent; subject of transitive predicate
O = object; patient of transitive predicate

Lexical classes

The lexical classes comprise root categories and closed word classes with grammatical functions. Root categories in Mayan languages include:

N = noun
V.INTR = intransitive verb
V.TR = transitive verb
ADJ = adjective
ADV = adverb
POS = positional
PART = particle
PRO = pronoun

Closed word classes include:

ART = article
CLF = classifier
CONJ = conjunction
DEM = demonstrative
EXIS = existential
INT = interrogative
NUM = numeral
PREP = preposition
RN = relational noun

Person categories

As it is the premise to gloss grammatical function, the practice of glossing pronouns by pronominal sets “A” and “B” that is common practice in Mayan linguistics is not followed here. Instead pronominal markers are glossed by person category and grammatical function.

Person-marking on verbs distinguishes absolutive pronouns (ABS) that mark S and O and ergative pronouns (ERG) that mark A. In Mayan languages with a split ergative system, ERG also marks S in a subset of intransitive verbal constructions.

Possessor-marking on nouns ist glossed separately as POSS, as not all Mayan languages employ the same sets of pronouns for this function. In most Mayan languages nominal predication (PRED) is marked with absolutive pronouns.

Person categories are glossed with numbers 1-3 and an abbreviation indicating singular or plural. The LGR use sg for singular and pl for plural. It is suggested here to gloss singular and plural person categories in Mayan languages as s and p instead.

(31) Singular and plural marking of person categories

    K’iche’

  • k-in-war-ik
    INC-1s.ABS-sleep-MOD.V.INTR
    ‘I sleep’
    
  • x-ø-q-eta’ma-j
    COM-3s.ABS-1p.ERG-learn-MOD.V.TR.D
    ‘we learned it = we know’
    

The labeling of singular and plural categories with lower case letters is inconsistent with the LGRs. However, lower case letters are chosen here to avoid confusion, as the LGR do not allow for clear distinction between nominal plural marking and plural suffixes in bipartite plural person marking as it occurs in most Western Mayan languages. In these languages, nominal plural, the third person absolutive pronoun and the plural complement of third person plural possessive/ergative marking are all marked by the same suffix. To allow for differentiation of all three functions, we suggest to gloss the plural complement as 3.PL. This solution is however not ideal and can lead to potential confusion, as the LGRs employ the same gloss to refer to the third person plural (3p). An alternative solution might still be preferable in this case.

(32) Differentiating nominal and verbal plural marking

    Ch’ol

  • iy-alob’il-ob’ 			cf.	iy-alob’il-ob’
    3s.POSS-child-PL			3p.POSS-child-3.PL
    ‘his/her children’			‘their child/ren’
    
  • tzi’-	tzɨñsa-yob’		cf. 	tzi’-	tzɨñsa-ø-yob’
    COM.3s.ERG-die.CAUS-3p.ABS 		COM.3p.ERG-die.CAUS-3s.ABS-3.PL
    ‘s/he killed them’			‘they killed him/her/it’
    
  • Yukatek

  • k-u-kíims-ik-o’ob’ 		cf.	k-u-kíims-ik-ø-o’ob’
    INC-3s.ERG-die.CAUS-INC-3p.ABS 		INC-3p.ERG-die.CAUS-INC-3s.ABS-3.PL
    ‘s/he kills them’			‘they kill him/her/it’
    

In Ch’ol, aspect markers or prepositions can fuse with the ergative prefix, which is analysed as a non-segmentable category. The phenomenon is also attested for other Mayan languages.

(33) Non-segmentable aspect-markers and prepositions

    Ch’ol

  • mi’-	y-ɨl-ø
    INC.3s.ERG-3s.ERG-say-3s.ABS
    
  • tzi’-	mel-e-ø	
    COM.3s.ERG-make-COM.V.TR-3s.ABS
    
  • tyi’-	y-ity
    PREP.3s.POSS-3s.POSS-buttocks
    

Some Western Mayan languages have an inclusive/exclusive contrast in the first person plural. The inclusive/exclusive gloss is inserted behind the person category 1p, separated by a period.

(34) Inclusive/exclusive contrast

    Ch’ol

  • lak-ña’	
    1p.INCL.POSS-mother
    ‘our mother (inclusive)’
    
  • k-ña’ 			lojoñ
    1p.EXCL.POSS-mother	1p.EXCL.POSS
    ‘our mother (exclusive)’
    
  • tza’	letz-i-yoñla
    COM	ascend-COM.V.INTR-1p.INCL.ABS
    ‘we (inclusive) ascended’
    
  • mi-j-	k’el-e-yety-lojoñ
    INC-1p.EXCL.ERG-see-COM.V.TR-2s.ABS-1p.EXCL.ERG
    ‘we (exclusive) saw you’
    

Inclusive/exclusive marking is also attested in Tzotzil. In the following example, the inclusive is marked on the plural marker.

(35) Inclusive/exclusive contrast in Tzotzil (Vinogradov 2014:43)

    Tzotzil

  • ch-i-tzak-at-otik	
    INC-1p.ABS-catch-PASS-1.INCL.PL
    ‘we would be caught’
    

K’iche’ is the only Mayan language that has a formal person, which is not marked on the reference verb/noun, but by a free pronominal particle in postposition. As a gloss for this formal person the abbreviation FORM is selected.

(36) Formal person

    K’iche’

  • k-inw-il		la	
    INC-1s.ERG-see		2s.ABS.FORM
    ‘I see you (formal)’
    
  • x-oj-il			alaq	
    COM-1p.ABS-see		2p.ERG.FORM
    ‘you (pl. formal) saw us‘
    

Person categories are combined in the gloss with the grammatical function of the marker, i.e. ABS, ERG and POSS.

(37) Person categories and their grammatical functions

    K’iche’

  • k-in-war-ik
    INC-1s.ABS-sleep-MOD.V.INTR
    ‘I sleep’
    
  • k-at-in-ch’ay-o
    INC-2s.ABS-1s.ERG-hit-MOD.V.TR
    ‘I hit you’
    
  • nu-tat
    1s.POSS-father
    ‘my father’
    

Preconsonantal and prevocalic forms and other forms of phonological assimilation in bound pronouns are not distinguished by different glosses. In Ch’ol the first person singular ergative marker k- becomes j- before consonants k and k’, i.e. k-j- / _[k].

(38) Phonological change/alternation in bound pronouns

    K’iche’

  • x-ø-a-b’an-o			~	x-ø-aw-il-o
    COM-3s.ABS-2s.ERG-make-MOD.V.TR		COM-3s.ABS-2s.ERG-see-MOD.V.TR
    ‘you made it’				‘you saw it’
    
  • Ch’ol

  • tza-j- 	k’el-e-yety 		~	mi-k-  	sikla-ñ-ety
    COM-1s.ERG-see-COM.V.TR-2s.ABS 		INC-1s.ERG-search-INC.V.TR.D-2s.ABS
    ‘I saw you’				‘I search (for) you’
    

Although most linguists gloss the person category on nominal predicates as an absolutive pronoun, this practice is inconsistent with the premise that only grammatical function glossed. We therefore suggest to use the abbreviation PRED to gloss person in these constructions (see also Vinogradov 2014).

(39) Person categories in nominal predicates

    K’iche’

  • in	achi
    1s.PRED	man
    ‘I am a man’
    
  • Ch’ol

  • k-pi’il-ety 
    1s.POSS-friend-2s.PRED
    ‘you [are] my friend’
    
  • b’uch-ul-ety 
    POS:sitting-ADJVZ-2s.PRED
    ‘you are (in the position of) sitting’
    
  • kol-em-ø 		jiñi 	otyoty 
    grow-PTCP-3s.PRED	ART 	house
    ‘this house [is] big’
    

Independent pronouns in Mayan languages are combinations of one set of dependent pronouns and determiners in form of articles or demonstratives. In many Mayan languages these forms have fused, in some they are still separated. In K’iche’ the independent pronoun is identical with the absolutive in the first and second person, in the third there is a separate free form. The free forms can combine with articles ri or le to form or occur individually. In these cases, articles and pronouns are glossed individually. In languages where the independent pronoun is a lexicalised complex form, the entire form is glossed (e.g. in Ch’ol).

(40) Glossing of independent pronouns

    K’iche’

  • (ri) 	in		in 		kos-inaq
    ART	1s.PRO		1s.PRED		tired-PTCP
    ‘I am tired’
    
  • ri 	are’ 		ø		kos-inaq
    ART	3s.PRO		3s.PRED		tired-PTCP
    ‘s/he is tired’
    
  • Ch’ol

  • joñoñ		k-ujil			e’tyel
    1s.PRO		1s.ERG-be.able.to	work
    ‘I am able to work’
    

Possessive constructions

Mayan languages distinguish alienably and inalienably possessed nouns, which fall into different classes depending on their respective marking patterns. A certain set of inalienably possessed nouns are marked with an absoluble suffix, when occurring in unpossessed contexts.

(41) Absoluble suffixes on unpossessed inalienably possessed nouns

    K’iche’

  • r-aqan 				aqan-aj
    3s.POSS-foot/leg 	→	foot/leg-ABSL
    ‘his/her foot/leg’		‘foot, leg’
    
  • u-k’ajol			k’ajol-axel
    3s.POSS-son.of.father	→	son.of.father-ABSL
    ‘his son’			‘son’
    
  • Ch’ol

  • i-chol				chol-el
    3s.POSS-maizefield	→	maizefield-ABSL
    ‘his/her maizefield’		‘maizefield (unpossessed)’
    
  • j-k’ɨb’ 		→	k’ɨb’-il 
    1s.POSS-arm 			arm-ABSL
    ‘my arm’			‘arm, branch (unpossessed)’
    
  • a-chich 		→	chich-il 
    2s.POSS-older sister 		older sister-ABSL
    ‘your older sister’		‘older sister (unpossessed)’
    

Inalienably possessed nouns which describe a relation to the human body or entity generally take a suffix (mostly –Vl) that marks the partitive relationship and is glossed as a relationaliser.

(42) Relationaliser suffixes on inalienably possessed nouns

    K’iche’

  • u-b’aq 			→	u-b’aq-il		
    3s.POSS-bone			3s.POSS-bone-RELZ
    ‘his/her bone’			‘his/her bone’ 
    alienable/non-partitive 	inalienable/partitive
    
  • Ch’ol

  • i-k’ajk			→	i-k’ajk-al
    3s.POSS-fire			3s.POSS-fire-RELZ
    ‘fire’				‘his/her fire = his/her fever’
    alienable/non-partitive 	inalienable/partitive
    
  • iy-ixim 	i-tyaty		→	iy-ixim-al 		chol-el
    3s.POSS-maize	3s.POSS-father		3s.POSS-maize-RELZ    	maizefield-ABSL
    ‘the maize of his father’		‘the maize of the maizefield’
    					(inanimate possessor)
    

Relational nouns and complex prepositions

Relational nouns are a common feature in Mayan as well as most Mesoamerican languages, which constitute a structural as well as a functional category. The term refers to a closed class of functionally restricted, inalienably possessed nouns which reference a syntactic relation and thus have prepositional function. These nouns can be body part terms referencing clear spatial relations as well as other roots referencing a non-spatial relation (‘with’, ‘by/through/because of’, ‘for the benefit of’, ‘alone’ etc.). Under XML, the lexical roots of relational nouns are annotated for their word class (RN) and for their functional meaning (e.g. BEN, COMIT, CAUS).

(43) Relational nouns with possessive person-marking

    K’iche’

  • are’		ajq’ij		r-ech		tinamit
    3s.PRO		diviner		3s.POSS-RN.BEN	town
    ‘he is the diviner for/of the town’
    
  • x-ø-b’e		k-uk’
    COM-3s.ABS-go	3p.POSS-RN.COMIT
    ‘s/he went with them’
    
  • k-e-kun-a-x			r-umal
    INC-3s.ABS-N:healing-TRVZ-PASS	3s.POSS-RN.CAUS
    ‘they were healed by him’
    

Complex prepositions are structurally distinct from relational nouns, inasmuch as they combine a basic preposition with a body part-noun (N) that is marked with a possessor.

(44) Complex prepositions with possessive person-marking

    Ch’ol

  • tyi’-pam 		mesa 
    PREP.3s.POSS-N:face 	N:table
    ‘on the face of the table = on the table’’
    
  • K’iche’

  • chi	u-pam			ri 	r-ochoch
    PREP	3s.POSS-N:stomach	ART	3s.POSS-N:house
    ‘inside his house’
    

Reflexives and indirect Objects

Reflexives are treated in some grammars as part of the set of relational nouns. Syntactically, however, they are possessed transitive complements. Their function is not to establish a relationship with a following NP, as it is the case with relational nouns/prepositions. Essentially, Mayan reflexives work the same way as in English and combine a possessor and a noun with the meaning ‘self’; they also include reciprocal readings. Reflexives are nevertheless glossed as a grammatical category.

(45) Reflexive constructions

    K’iche’

  • k-ø-inw-il		w-ib’		→	k-ø-inw-il		w-ib’
    INC-3s.ABS-1s.ERG-see	1s.POSS-N:self		INC-3s.ABS-1s.ERG-see	1s.POSS-REFL
    ‘I see (it) my self = I see myself’		‘I see myself’
    
  • Yukatek

  • k-in-jatz’-ik-ø			in-b’a
    HAB-1s.ERG-beat-INC.V.TR-3s.ABS	1s.POSS-N:self/REFL
    ‘I beat (it) my self = I beat myself’
    
  • Ch’ol

  • tzi’-		jatz’-ɨ-ø-yob’		i-b’ɨ
    COM.3p.ERG-hit-COM.V.TR-3s.ABS-3.PL	3p.ERG-N:self/REFL
    ‘they hit their selves = they hit each other’
    

In most Mayan languages indirect objects are realised by oblique phrases introduced by prepositions. As grammaticalised forms they are often referred to as “dative pronouns”, which however does not adequately describe the form that is used.

(46) Indirect objects

    K’iche’

  • k-ø-in-ya’		chi	r-ech
    INC-3s.ABS-1s.ERG-give	PREP	3s.POSS-RN.BEN
    ‘I give it to his benefit/possession = I give it to him’
    
  • Yukatek

  • k-in-tz’a’-ik-ø			t-eech
    HAB-1s.ERG-give-INC.V.TR-3s.ABS	PREP-2s.ABS
    ‘I give it to you’
    

Agentives

There are different types of agentive nominalisation in Mayan languages. All Mayan languages share the feature of agentive prefixes or proclitics, which precede nominal and adjectival stems, or even nominal phrases, to derive agentive nouns.

(47) Agentive prefixes/proclitics

    K’iche’

  • aj-chak
    AGT-work
    ‘worker’
    
  • aj-r-el-ib’al 			q’ij
    AGT-3s.POSS-emerge-NMLZ-INSTR	sun
    ‘eastener’
    
  • Yukatek

  • h-tz’óon
    AGT-hunt.AP
    ‘hunter’
    

Yukatek seems to be the only Mayan language that distinguishes masculine and feminine agents morphologically. Masculine agents are marked with h- while feminine agents are marked with š-. The gender distinction is marked in the gloss.

(48) Gender distinction in agentive prefixes/proclitics in Yukatek

    Yukatek

  • h-kòon-ol 				x-kòon-ol
    AGT.M-sell.AP-ABSTR 		cf.	AGT.F-sell.AP-ABSTR
    ‘salesman (= the one of selling)’	‘saleswoman (= the one of selling)’
    

Etymologically, h- derives from the gender-non-specific agentive aj found across the language family, while x- is clearly related to the likewise common female nominal classifier (i)x. Only in Yukatek both markers developed into a gender-based paradigm. In Classic Mayan classifier and agentive can co-occur in the same word, e.g. Ix Aj k’uhun [IX-AJ-K’UH-HU’N-(na)] ‘female venerator/keeper’ (Jackson & Stuart 2001).

Positionals

Positional roots are a distinctive feature in the Mayan language family. Yet, in some cases there is no clear consensus about what constitutes a positional root. In many Mayan languages, positional roots do not occur on their own and require a derivational operator. The meaning of the positional root is glossed with an English verbal noun.

(49) Glossing of positional roots

    K’iche’

  • k-ø-u-kotz’-ob’a’ 			ri	ab’aj
    INC-3s.ABS-3s.ERG-POS:lie.down-TRVZ	ART	stone
    ‘he laid down the stone’
    
  • Ch’ol

  • mi’- 	b’uch-tyɨ-l 				tyi 	lum 
    INC.3s.ERG-POS:sitting-INTRVZ-INC.V.INTR 	PREP 	earth
    ‘he sits on the ground’
    
  • b’uch-ul-oñ 
    POS:sitting-ADJVZ-1s.PRED		 
    ‘I am (in a) sitting (position)’ 
    

Preliminary list of glossing conventions

1 first person
2 second person
3 third person
A agent-like argument in canonical transitive verb
ABS absolutive
ABSL absoluble
ABSTR abstractive
ADJ adjective
ADJVZ adjectivizer
ADV adverb(ial)
ADVLZ adverbializer
AFF affirmative
AGT agentive
ANT anterior
AP antipassive
APPL applicative
ART article
ASS assertive
AUX auxiliary
BEN benefactive
CAUS causative
CLF classifier
COMIT comitative
COM completive
COND conditional
CONJ conjunction
COP copula
CVB converb
DEF definite
DEM demonstrative
DET determiner
DIM diminuitive
DIR directional
DIST distal
DISTR distributive
DU dual
DUB dubitative
DUR durative
EMPH emphasis
ERG ergative
EXCL exclusive
EXIS existential
F feminine
FOC focus
FORM formal
FREQ frequentative
FUT future
IMP imperative
INC aspect, incompletive
INCH inchoative
INCL inclusive
INDF indefinite
INSTR instrumental
INT interrogative, question markers
INTENS intensifier
INTR intransitive
INTRVZ intransitivizer
IPFV imperfective
IRR irrealis
LD left dislocation
LEN lentitive
LOC locative
M masculine
MOD modal marker
MODER moderative
N noun (lexical root category)
NEG negation, negative
NMLZ nominalizer/nominalization
NN unknown
NUM numeral
O/P patient-like argument in canonical transitive verbs
OBJ object
OBL oblique (syntactic gloss)
OPT optative
p plural in person categories
PART particle
PASS passive
PFV perfective
PL plural (on nominal categories)
POS positional (ROOT)
POSS possessive
POT potential (aspect)
PRED predicative (syntactic)
PREP preposition
PRF perfect
PRO pronoun
PROG progressive
PROH prohibitive
PROX proximal/proximate
PST past
PTCP participle
PURP purposive
QUOT quotative
RECP reciprocal
REFL reflexive
REL relative
RELZ relationalizer
REP repetitive
REPRT reportative
RES resultative
RN relational noun
SBJ subject
s singular in person categories
S single argument of canonical intransitive verb
SG singular (on nominal categories)
STAT stative
SUPER superlative
TEMP temporal
TOP topic
TR transitive
TRVZ transitivization
V verb (root)
VN verbal noun

References

Academia de las Lenguas Mayas de Guatemala (ALMG)
1988 Lenguas Mayas de Guatemala: Documento de referencia para la pronunciación de los nuevos alfabetos oficiales. Documento; 1. Guatemala: Instituto Indigenista Nacional.
Avelino Becerra, Heriberto (ed.)
2011 New Perspectives in Mayan Linguistics. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
Bricker, Victoria R., Po’ot Yah, E. & Dzul de Po’ot, O.
1998 A Dictionary of the Maya Language: As Spoken in Hocabá, Yucatán. Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press.
Dürr, Michael
1987 Morphologie, Syntax und Textstrukturen des (Maya-)Quiche des Popol Vuh. Linguistische B-Beschreibung eines kolonialzeitlichen Dokuments aus dem Hochland von Guatemala. Mundus Reihe Alt-Amerikanistik; 2. Bonn: Holos.
Jackson, Sarah & David Stuart
2001 The Aj K’uhun Title. Ancient Mesoamerica, 12: 217-228.
Kaufman, Terrence
1971 Tzeltal Phonology and Morphology. Berkeley / Los Angeles: University of California Press.
1990 Algunos rasgos estructurales de los idiomas mayances con referencia especial al K’iche’. In Lecturas sobre la lingüística maya; Nora C. England & Stephen R. Elliott (eds.): 59-114. Antigua Guatemala: CIRMA.
Lehmann, Christian
2004 Interlinear Morphemic Glossing. In Morphologie. Ein internationales Handbuch zur Flexion und Wortbildung (= Handbücher der Sprach- und Kommunikationswissenschaft. 2. Halbband, Nr. 17/2); Geert Booij, Christian Lehmann, Joachim Mugdan & Stavros Skopeteas (eds.):1834.1857. Berlin: De Gruyter.
Leipzig Glossing Rules (LGR)
2008 The Leipzig Glossing Rules: Conventions for interlinear morpheme-by-morpheme glosses. (URL: https://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/pdf/LGR08.02.05.pdf).
López Ixcoy, Candelaria Dominga (Saqijix)
1997 Ri Ukemiik ri K’ichee’ Ch’ab’al: Gramática K’ichee’. Guatemala: Cholsamaj.
Montgomery, John
2002 How to Read Maya Hieroglyphs. New York: Hippocrene Books.
Romero, Sergio F.
2006 Sociolinguistic Variation and Linguistic History in Mayan: The Case of K’ichee’. PhD thesis, Department of Linguistics, University of Pennsylvania.
Sachse, Frauke, Michael Dürr & Christian W. R. Klingler
accepted Digitale Erschließung und systematische Annotation kolonialer Lexikographien am Beispiel der Mayasprache K’iche’. DARIAH Working Papers. [expected 2016]
Smailus, Ortwin
1989 Gramática del Maya Yucateco colonial. Wayasbah; 9. Hamburg: Wayasbah.
Verhoeven, Elisabeth
2007 Experiential Constructions in Yucatec Maya: A Typologically Based Analysis of a Functional Domain in a Mayan Village. Studies in Language Companion Series, 87. Amsterdam; Philadelphia: John Benjamins Pub.
Vinogradov, Igor
2014 Aspect Switching in Tzotzil (Mayan) Narratives. Oklahoma Working Papers in Indigenous Languages; 1: 39-54.

Footnotes   [ + ]

1. The participants of the workshop who contributed to the discussion and examples that are used in the present paper include in alphabetical order: Katja Diederichs, Sven Gronemeyer, Christian Prager, Elisabeth Wagner (for TWKM) as well as Michael Dürr, Christian W.R. Klingler and Frauke Sachse (for TSACK).
2. TSACK was developed in a pilot study for a project on the lexicography of colonial K’iche’ that will be undertaken by the authors of this paper. The research was funded at the University of Bonn between October 2013 and September 2014 (Maria von Linden-Programm). The programming was carried out by Christian Klingler, who was imminently involved in the theoretical development of the software.
3. This line is added for explanation and not to be reproduced in the glossing.
4. “As expected, there are also infixes that occur before the final element of their hosts. In the Mayan language Tzeltal, a group of numeral classifiers is derived from verbs by infixation of h before the final consonant (when the latter is a stop or an affricate; in all other cases, h is deleted; see Kaufman 1971). Examples of this phenomenon include the following: huht ‚holes‘, from hut ‚be perforated‘; lihk ‚ropes, cords‘, from lik ‚carry‘, and peht ‚handfuls of wood‘, from pet ‚embrace (below the arms)‘.“

Die Maya im digitalen Zeitalter

Vortrag

Die hölzernen Türsturze aus Tikal gehören zu den wichtigsten Kunstwerken der vorspanischen Maya. Wir diskutieren über den neuesten Stand zur Forschung ihrer Hieroglyphentexte und Bildwerke und stellen ein neues digitales Dokumentationsprojekt zur Analyse der bekannten klassischen Maya-Texte vor, das zur Herstellung eines digitalen Wörterbuchs führen wird.

Christian Prager, Sven Gronemeyer und Elisabeth Wagner werden unter der Moderation Alexander Brust am Mittwoch, den 2. März 2016 von 18 bis 20 Uhr einen Vortrag am Museum der Kulturen in Basel halten. Für den Vortrag ist eine Eintrittsgebühr fällig.

Weitere Informationen sind im Museumsflyer auf Seite 7 enthalten.

Ein TEI-Metadatenschema für die Auszeichnung des Klassischen Maya

Working Paper 3

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.20376/IDIOM-23665556.15.wp003.de

Petra Maier

ULB Heinrich-Heine-Universität, Düsseldorf

Das vorliegende Papier wurde zuerst als DARIAH-DE Working Paper 8 unter CC BY 4.0 veröffentlicht – Petra Maier: „Die Erstellung eines TEI-Metadatenschemas für die Auszeichnung von Texten des Klassischen Maya“. DARIAH-DE Working Papers Nr. 8. Göttingen: DARIAH-DE, 2015. URN: urn:nbn:de:gbv:7-dariah-2015-1-6. Die hier vorliegende Fassung wurde für die TWKM Working Papers neu formatiert, mit teilweise geänderten Abbildungen.

Ausgangslage

Anfang 2014 startete das durch die Nordrhein-Westfälische Akademie der Wissenschaften und Künste geförderte Projekt „Textdatenbank und Wörterbuch des Klassischen Maya“ (TWKM) unter der Leitung von Prof. Dr. Nikolai Grube (Abteilung für Altamerikanistik an der Philosophischen Fakultät der Universität Bonn). Das Projekt, das in Kooperation mit dem Forschungsverbund TextGrid (unter der Leitung der Niedersächsischen Staats- und Universitätsbibliothek Göttingen) und der Universitäts- und Landesbibliothek Bonn durchgeführt wird, hat eine geplante Gesamtlaufzeit von 15 Jahren; der Gesamtprojektplan gliedert sich in fünf Abschnitte zu jeweils drei Jahren. Gesamtziel des Projektes ist die Erschließung sämtlicher bekannter Maya-Hieroglyphentexte in einem digitalen Textkorpus, das die Grundlage für epigrafische und linguistische Analysen bildet. Mit Ablauf des TWKM-Projektes soll ein Wörterbuch – in digitaler und gedruckter Form – erstellt werden, das den gesamten bekannten Wortschatz enthält, und dessen Verwendung in der Schrift widerspiegelt (vgl. Grube 2011: 13).

Als Teilziel des ersten TWKM-Projektabschnitts ist die Erstellung einer Arbeitsversion des Wörterbuches in elektronischer Form vorgesehen. Um dies zu ermöglichen, war u. a. die Konzipierung eines Datenmodells in einer elektronischen Forschungsumgebung notwendig. Solch ein umfassendes Forschungsvorhaben, das die Erfassung aller bekannter Inschriftenobjekte und deren Inschriften beinhaltet, sowie die spätere weitere Erforschung noch unbekannter bzw. mehrdeutiger Schriftzeichen ermöglichen soll, setzt ein komplexes Metadatenkonzept voraus. Bereits mit dem Projektantrag war vorgesehen, dass die Erschließung der Inschriftentexte mittels des Standards TEI des gleichnamigen Konsortiums TEI (Text Encoding Initiative) erfolgen soll (vgl. Grube 2011: 13).

Kurze Darstellung des Klassischen Maya

Um das Verständnis der Projektdokumentation zu erleichtern und in das Thema einzuführen, werden im Folgenden das Klassische Maya und dessen zeitlich-geografischer Kontext kurz dargestellt.

Geografisch erstreckt sich das Gebiet der Maya über die heutigen Gebiete der mexikanischen Bundesstaaten Chiapas, Tabasco, Campeche, Quintana Roo und Yukatan, den Staaten Belize, Guatemala, sowie westliche Abschnitte von Honduras und El Salvador (Abbildung 1).

Abbildung 1: Geografische Lage des Maya-Gebietes, Entwurf Sven Gronemeyer nach Grube & Gaida (2006: 23) mit Höhenrelief der Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), PIA03364, mit Genehmigung von NASA/JPL-Caltech.

Die Schriftlichkeit diente den Maya der vorspanischen Zeit zur Repräsentation der Herrscher und ihrer Familien: Oftmals werden Ereignisse wie die Geburt, Inthronisierung usw. in den Inschriften beschrieben, wobei diese Anlässe i. d. R. mit Kalenderdaten versehen sind, sodass sich die Inschriften bzw. die dort beschriebenen Ereignisse auf den Tag genau datieren lassen. Durch eine in der Maya-Forschung anerkannte Korrelation können diese Datumsangaben in den gregorianischen Kalender übertragen werden (vgl. Grube & Gaida 2006: 22-24).

Die Maya-Schrift ist eine Hieroglyphenschrift, deren frühesten erhaltenen Schriftzeugnisse aus dem 3. Jh. v. Chr. stammen. Mit Beginn der Klassik (250 bis 900 n. Chr.) „breitet sich die Schriftkultur im gesamten Maya-Gebiet aus.“ (vgl. Grube 1993: 222-225) Im Laufe ihrer Geschichte „hat sich die Maya-Schrift immer wieder verändert und sich den wechselnden Bedürfnissen ihrer Verfasser und Auftraggeber angepasst. Immer wieder wurden neue Zeichen erfunden, alte nicht weiter verwendet, manche veränderten ihre Lesung“ (Grube 1993: 225f).

Mit Eroberung des Maya-Gebietes durch die Spanier zu Beginn des 16. Jahrhunderts verschwand die Hieroglyphenschrift aus dem Gebrauch, und damit auch die Kenntnis dieser Schrift (vgl. Grube 1993: 215f).

Die Schrift der Maya ist eine sogenannte logosyllabische Schrift, d. h. sie besteht aus zwei Arten von Schriftzeichen, den Logogrammen (Wortzeichen) und den Syllabogrammen (Silbenzeichen) (Vgl. Gronemeyer 1999: Kap. 2,1). Ein Hieroglyphenblock entspricht zumeist einem Wort und setzt sich durchschnittlich aus drei bis vier Zeichen zusammen, i. d. R. in einer Kombination aus Logogrammen und Silbenzeichen. Insgesamt werden aktuell in der Mayaforschung 650 Zeichen unterschieden. Für Silben, die oft verwendet wurden, gibt es unterschiedliche Zeichen, sodass der „Schreiber“ Wiederholungen vermeiden konnte. Überwiegend sind die Inschriftentexte lesbar bzw. interpretierbar, aber noch sind nicht alle Zeichen entziffert. Manche Zeichenfolgen können zwar gelesen werden, aber deren Sinn ist (noch) nicht erschlossen (vgl. Grube 2011: 6, 11). Die Sprache des Klassischen Maya weist eine Verwandtschaft zu den heute gesprochenen Chol-Sprachen auf, die v. a. in den mexikanischen Bundesstaaten des ehemaligen Maya-Gebietes verbreitet sind, und den yukatekischen Sprachen, d. h. des Sprachgebiets der Halbinsel Yukatan (vgl. Grube 1993: 222). Dadurch tragen Korrelationen zwischen dem Klassischen Maya und den heutigen Maya-Sprachen zur Entzifferung bei.

Es gibt unterschiedliche Objekttypen, auf denen Inschriften bzw. Bilder erhalten sind; dabei handelt es sich aufgrund des feucht-warmen Klimas in der Mayaregion um unvergängliche Materialien wie Stein und Keramik: beispielsweise freistehende Monumente, architektonische Schriftträger (z. B. Türsturz oder auch eine Hieroglyphentreppe), Schmuck, Keramik, Kleinplastiken, aber auch in Höhlen wurden Inschriften gefunden in Form von Malereien oder Felsreliefs (z. B. in den Höhlen von Naj Tunich). Einen seltenen Fall stellen Kodizes dar, von denen nur drei bekannt sind.

Forschungsstand

In der Erforschung der Schrift und Sprache des Klassischen Maya fehlten bislang umfassende Dokumentationen. Es gibt einige Wörterverzeichnisse, die sich auf die Untersuchung punktueller Fragestellungen oder ausgewählter Hieroglyphen beschränken. Seit Ende der 1990er Jahre sind lexikografische Zusammenstellungen erschienen, die zwar kommentiert sind (also über eine rein alphabetische Auflistung hinausreichen), aber eine Dokumentation der räumlichen Verbreitung und zeitlichen Veränderungen der Schrift vermissen lassen. Dadurch können mit diesen Wortzusammenstellungen (heutige) Forschungsfragen etwa zu der Entwicklung der Schrift nicht untersucht werden.

In der Maya-Forschung beruhen die Defizite und Lücken auf der bislang unvollständigen Dokumentation und dem Mangel an digitaler Erschließung des Quellenmaterials. In anderen Sprachbereichen gibt es Projekte, die den Wissenschaftlern umfassende digitale Inschriften-Corpora zur Verfügung stellen: z. B. kann in dem digitalen Corpus Thesaurus Linguae Aegyptiae (TLA)1)Thesaurus Linguae Aegyptiae. Arbeitsstelle Altägyptisches Wörterbuch. Berlin-Brandenburgische Akademie der Wissenschaften. http://aaew.bbaw.de/tla/index.html (04.08.2014). in ägyptischen Textmaterialien recherchiert werden, und durch bestimmte Analyseanfragen (z. B. nach Worthäufigkeiten) lassen sich unterschiedliche forschungsrelevante Fragestellungen beantworten. Zudem liegt für alle Texte eine Übersetzung vor. Ein ähnliches Vorhaben stellt das Projekt Pennsylvania Sumerian Dictionary (PSD)2)Pennsylvania Sumerian Dictionary. University of Pennsylvania. http://psd.museum.upenn.edu/epsd1/index.html (04.08.2014). der Universität Pennsylvania dar, in dessen Rahmen ein umfassendes Wörterbuch des Sumerischen erstellt wurde. Eine Besonderheit dieses Projektes ist, dass die für die Erstellung des Corpus und für die Arbeit mit der Sumerischen Sprache entwickelten Tools frei zur Verfügung gestellt werden. Dadurch ist eine Nachnutzung für andere Projekte möglich.

Das Format TEI

Gemäß den Vorgaben des Projektantrages erfolgt die Erschließung der Hieroglyphentexte mittels eines TEI-Metadatenschemas. Metadaten sind in diesem Kontext allgemein als strukturierte Informationen zu den Maya-Texten als Ganzes sowie zur Auszeichnung einzelner Besonderheiten in den Texten zu verstehen. Das Metadatenschema für die Texte schließt somit auch lokale Annotationen des Textes selbst mit ein.

Die Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) ist eine internationale Organisation, die 1987 gegründet wurde, um Richtlinien zur Kodierung maschinenlesbarer Texte insbesondere aus den Bereichen der Geistes- und Sozialwissenschaften zu entwickeln3)Vgl. “TEI: Frequently Asked Questions”. TEI Consortium. http://www.tei-c.org/release/doc/tei-p5-doc/en/html/TitlePageVerso.html (04.08.2014).. Zugleich wird die Abkürzung TEI auch für das Metadatenset selbst verwendet, so auch in der folgenden Projektdokumentation4)Um die Unterscheidung der beiden Projekte zu erleichtern, wird im Folgenden das Rahmenprojekt als TWKM-Projekt bezeichnet..

TEI verwendet die Auszeichnungssprache ‚Extensible Markup Language‘ (XML), die sich heute als Standard in den geisteswissenschaftlichen Fachgebieten zur digitalen Beschreibung von Quellmaterialien durchgesetzt hat und damit gezielte Abfragen und Weiterverarbeitungen ermöglicht. Aufgrund des standardisierten Elementesets hat TEI den Vorteil einer langfristigen und eindeutigen Interpretierbarkeit der Datensätze. Des Weiteren wird durch den Einsatz von TEI in einem solchen Projekt wie TWKM die Anerkennung des Formats als Standard vorangetrieben und damit ein Datenaustausch erleichtert (Rouché & Flanders 2007-2014, vgl. Werning 2013: 3).

Das Metadatenschema TEI in der aktuellen Version P 5 stellt eine definierte Menge an XML-Elementen dar. Das Schema ist unterteilt in unterschiedliche Module, die jeweils bestimmte Elemente und Attribute auszeichnen. Bspw. werden in dem Modul ‚dictionaries‘ die Elemente zur Kodierung digitaler Lexika definiert. Ein Element kann andere Elemente oder auch reinen Text enthalten. Jeder TEI-konformen Text wird durch das Element <teiHeader> eingeleitet. Dieser bildet gewissermaßen das Titelblatt der elektronischen Textdatei und beinhaltet u.a. die Dateibeschreibung (obligat) oder Angaben zur Textrevision (optional). Innerhalb einer TEI-Datei kann der Header wiederholt verwendet werden. Auf den Header folgt der Textkörper, der je nach zu beschreibendem Text sehr unterschiedlich erscheinen kann.

TEI verfolgt zwei Ziele: Zum einen soll den Wissenschaftlern ermöglicht werden, ihre Quellmaterialien mittels einer Beschreibungssprache digital darzustellen, zum anderen diese digitalen Informationen durch die Nutzung einer gemeinsamen Kodierung allgemein verständlich zu repräsentieren. TEI kann sehr detailliert und spezialisiert auf unterschiedliche Quellmaterialien, d.h. mit einer umfassenden Kodierung, verwendet werden. Ebenso ist es möglich, die Kodierung auf die wesentlichen Informationen zu beschränken ohne Spezialisierung auf besondere Phänomene. Die detaillierte Kodierung hat den Vorteil, dass der beschriebene Text mehr Verwendungsmöglichkeiten bietet, wie z. B. gezielte Abfragen; zu berücksichtigen ist allerdings, dass sich dadurch auch der Eingabeaufwand erhöht und eine größere Sachkenntnis notwendig ist. Der Einsatz von TEI in unterschiedlichen Bereichen wird zudem dadurch unterstützt, dass die Auszeichnungssprache durch projektspezifische Anpassungen für die eigenen Zwecke definiert werden kann. Dies fördert zusätzlich die Nachnutzung und Verbreitung des TEI-Standards, und kann zu gegenseitigen Anregungen der unterschiedlichen Wissenschaftsbereiche führen und diese zugleich voneinander differenzieren (vgl. Rouché & Flanders 2007-2014). Das Metadatenschema für die Texte des Klassischen Maya stellt somit ein für diesen Zweck zusammengestelltes Metadatenset dar, das die spezifischen Angaben zu beschreiben vermag.

In zahlreichen Projekten, in denen digitale Texte unterschiedlichster Gattungen erschlossen werden, wird das Metadatenschema TEI herangezogen; auf der Homepage der Initiative kann eine Liste mit einer Auswahl eingesehen werden. Darunter auch Projekte zur Erschließung digitaler Texte epigrafischen Quellenmaterials, z. B. Inscriptions of Aphrodisias des King’s College London5)Vgl. “Projects Using the TEI.” TEI Consortium. http://www.tei-c.org/Activities/Projects/ (04.08.2014) und Reynolds, Roueché & Godard 2007, http://insaph.kcl.ac.uk/iaph2007/..

Projektdefinition und -planung

Zielsetzung

Ziel dieses Teilprojektes war es, die ersten Grundlagen für das TEI-Metadatenschema zur Erfassung sämtlicher Klassischer Maya-Texte zu erarbeiten; das TEI-Metadatenschema bildet hierbei einen Bestandteil des gesamten Metadatenkonzepts. Da das TWKM-Projekt erst am Anfang stand und noch viele Fragen bezüglich der Dateninhalte offen waren, sollte dieses TEI-Metadatenschema eine Grundlage sein, die im weiteren Verlauf des TWKM-Projektes angepasst werden konnte. Daher wurden in den Ergebnissen auch kritische Punkte und Probleme thematisiert. Ein fertiges Metadatenschema war nicht Ziel dieses Teilprojekts.

Vorgehensweise allgemein

Die Zuständigkeiten innerhalb des TWKM-Projektes teilen sich in zwei Bereiche: Fachwissenschaftlichen Aufgaben, die das Klassische Maya betreffen, sowie die technische und informationswissenschaftliche Betreuung.

Für die Erfassung der Inschriftentexte des Klassischen Maya ist es notwendig, die grundlegende Struktur der Sprache zu kennen. Dies ist in zweierlei Hinsicht von Bedeutung: Zum einen ist es die Grundvoraussetzung für die Erfassung der relevanten Daten, zum anderen ist es für die Verständigung mit den Wissenschaftlern notwendig, um die Bedürfnisse besser nachvollziehen zu können. Daher war es notwendig, sich in die Sprache des Klassischen Maya einzuarbeiten, um den Aufbau und die Fachbegriffe zu kennen.

Um die für die Wissenschaftler wichtigen Informationen zu erfassen und unterschiedliche Aspekte der Forschung abzudecken, wurden für das Metadatenkonzept verschiedene Ebenen berücksichtigt:

  • Materielles Objekt: hierzu zählen neben den Artefakten der Maya auch moderne Dokumentationen wie Abriebzeichnungen, Fundberichte etc.
  • Inschrift: die Erfassung der Hieroglyphentexte an sich und aller zu den Inschriften gehörenden Informationen
  • Ort: sowohl der Fundort als auch Aufbewahrungsorte (z. B. Museen) sind relevant
  • ‚Akteur‘: sowohl die auf den Inschriften genannten Akteure (z. B. Herrscher, Gottheiten) der Inschriftentexte bzw. –Abbildungen als auch moderne Akteure wie an der Ausgrabung beteiligte Forscher oder auch das aufbewahrende Museum werden hierunter gefasst
  • Zeit: hierunter fallen die Datierung des Objektes (mit der wichtigen Anforderung der Umsetzung des Mayakalenders in den Gregorianischen Kalender), der Zeitpunkt der Entdeckung usw.

Für die Erfassung aller notweniger Daten und Informationen wurden unterschiedliche Metadatenstandards herangezogen, um den vielfältigen Facetten gerecht zu werden. So werden die Inschriftenträger überwiegend durch CIDOC CRM6)Das CIDOC Conceptual Reference Model (CRM) stellt ein Dokumentationsformat für den Bereich des Kulturellen Erbes dar und ist seit 2006 offizieller ISO-Standard (ISO 21127:2006). Dieses Format wurde gewählt, um die zahlreichen Aspekte, wie bspw. Fundhistorie, Aufbewahrungshistorie, Personen wie Ausgräber, Kuratoren etc., die sich auf das Objekt selbst beziehen, adäquat abbilden zu können. beschrieben. Zur Erschließung der Inschrift selbst wurde das Metadatenschema der TEI herangezogen, das später auch die Basis für die Analyse der Mayaschrift und für die Erstellung des Mayawörterbuches darstellt. Da sich dieses Teilprojekt auf die Erarbeitung der relevanten Metadaten für die Inschrifttexte bezieht, wird im Folgenden dieser Part beschrieben. Die Feldbezeichnungen der Elemente sowie die Begriffe der Textstruktur sind Englisch, die bevorzugte Sprache des TWKM-Projektes bzw. der späteren TWKM-Datenbank.

Vorgehensweise bei der Erschließung der Inschriftentexte

Ausgehend von den Zielen und Vorstellungen der Fachwissenschaftler, welche sich aus dem Projektantrag an die Akademie der Wissenschaften und Künste und den Gesprächen ergaben, wurden die Anforderungen an das Metadatenschema bezüglich der Inschriftentexte formuliert. Um das sehr umfangreiche TEI-Metadatenset einzugrenzen, wurde eine Auswahl relevanter Module getroffen, die für die Erschließung der Inschriftentexte infrage kommen. Da TEI bereits in anderen epigrafischen Erschließungsprojekten als Grundlage dient, wurden zudem vergleichbare Projekte ermittelt, um Aufschluss über deren Metadatenstruktur zu erhalten.

Anforderungen seitens der Wissenschaft

Die von den Wissenschaftlern gestellten Anforderungen lassen sich in zwei Bereiche gliedern: der erste Teil beinhaltet diejenigen, die sich auf das gesamte Metadatenschema beziehen; der zweite Teil listet diejenigen auf, die speziell bei der Beschreibung der Inschrift berücksichtigt werden müssen.

1. Allgemeingültige Anforderungen

  • Metadatenelemente für die Erschließung aller bekannten und künftig gefundenen Inschriftentexte, d. h. unterschiedliche Darstellungen müssen berücksichtigt werden können
  • Einbindung zeitlicher und räumlicher Angaben, d. h. Fundort und Datierung müssen immer abrufbar sein
  • Schriftvarietäten in Korrelation mit der jeweiligen Zeit (Datierung) muss ablesbar sein, d. h. die genaue Schreibweise der Hieroglyphe resp. der Schriftzeichen muss mit dem jeweiligen (datierten) Text in Verbindung gesetzt werden
  • Ermöglichen einer sprach- und schriftbasierten Suchfunktion in der Datenbank, d. h. originale Schreibung, Umschrift und Übersetzung müssen erschlossen sein
  • Berücksichtigung nicht entzifferter Textstellen mit einer Abbildung der Originalschreibung
  • Verweise auf Sekundärliteratur (Kurzzitate mit einer URN zu einem Literaturverzeichnis)
  • Nachnutzbarkeit für andere Projekte sollte gewährleistet sein, d. h. das Metadatenschema sollte möglichst flexibel sein

2. Textspezifische Anforderungen

  • Text-Bildbezug abbilden
  • Die Anzahl der Textfelder sowie der Hieroglyphenblöcke bzw. Zeichen je Textfeld auf einem Inschriftenträger müssen berechnet werden können
  • Form/Darstellung der Texte (Einzel-, Doppelkolumne, rechtwinklig etc.) muss ersichtlich sein
  • Farbige Textbereiche definieren können
  • Beschreibung unterschiedlich großer Blöcke, d. h. ‚Großbuchstaben‘ und kleiner dargestellte Blöcke müssen unterschieden werden können
  • Erschließung der Inschrift und Interpretation des Textes sind zu trennen
  • Lesefolge und Ausrichtung der einzelnen Schriftzeichen müssen ausgezeichnet werden

Metadatenschema für die Erfassung der Inschriftentexte

Da die Beschreibungssprache TEI aufgrund ihrer ursprünglichen Entwicklungsgedanken für möglichst viele Bereiche der Geisteswissenschaften geeignet sein soll und ein sehr umfangreiches Set an Elementen bereithält, ist die erste Durchsicht nach geeigneten Elementen zeitaufwendig.

Eine Eingrenzung für die Epigrafik bietet EpiDoc (Epigraphic Documents). EpiDoc ist eine internationale Gemeinschaft von Wissenschaftlern mit dem Forschungsschwerpunkt antike Inschriften. Diese Gemeinschaft hat Empfehlungen für die XML-Kodierung der Inschriftentexte erarbeitet, die ein Subset der TEI-P5-Guidelines darstellen und speziell auf die Arbeit mit antiken und mittelalterlichen Texten ausgerichtet sind. Die Empfehlungen sind inzwischen von altgriechischen und lateinischen Inschriften auch auf die Beschreibung Papyri und Manuskripten ausgeweitet worden (vgl. Elliott, Bodard & Cayless et al. 2006-2013). Der Vorteil dieser Empfehlungen liegt darin, die für die Beschreibung von Inschriftentexten ungeeigneten TEI-Elemente von vorneherein auszuschließen und zugleich durch eigene Ergänzungen an Definitionen die Beschreibung epigrafischen Quellmaterials optimal zu unterstützen (vgl. Roueché & Flanders 2007-2014).

Um eine erste Auswahl an Elementen zu treffen, welche für die fachgerechte Beschreibung der Inschriftentexte infrage kommen könnten, wurden zunächst die Module der TEI-P5-Guidelines sondiert, die auf eine Relevanz schließen ließen (vgl. TEI Consortium 2014, 2). Folgende Bereiche wurden identifiziert:

  • header: Jeder TEI-konforme Text muss bestimmte Beschreibungen zu der Datei selbst angeben, sodass das Modul für jede TEI-Datei relevant ist.
  • core: Das Modul enthält Elemente, die in allen zu beschreibenden Textgattungen vorkommen können. Viele dieser Kern-Elemente sind flexibel einsetzbar und können an jeder Textstelle erscheinen.
  • textstructure: Die Elemente dieses Moduls dienen der Beschreibung der äußeren Textstruktur. Da die Inschriftentexte in der Anordnung der Hieroglyphen strukturiert sind, können Elemente dieses Moduls für die Beschreibung relevant sein.
  • gaiji: Dieses Modul beinhaltet Elemente für die Beschreibung von ungebräuchlichen Schrifttypen, Symbolen und Hieroglyphen. Da die Maya-Schrift eine Hieroglyphenschrift ist, die sich aus einzelnen Zeichen zusammensetzt, wird dieses Modul in Betracht gezogen.
  • figure: Für die Wiedergabe von Abbildungen, Tabellen usw., die in einem Text erscheinen, werden in diesem Modul die Elemente definiert. Auf den Inschriftenobjekten des Klassischen Maya sind oftmals Abbildungen vorhanden, die in Bezug zu dem Text stehen und daher – neben dem Text selbst – ausreichend dargestellt werden müssen.
  • transcr: Das Modul definiert die Elemente zur Darstellung der Primärquelle, also der Inschriftentexte selbst. Da in dem TWKM-Projekt die Abbildungen der Quellen (z. B. Digitalfotografien der Inschriftenträger) einbezogen werden müssen, wurde dieses Modul in die Überlegungen einbezogen.

Die Module, die sich augenscheinlich auf analytische Aspekte beziehen bzw. sehr speziell auf einzelne Textgattungen ausgerichtet sind, wurden für die erste Einarbeitung nicht berücksichtigt.

Bei EpiDoc werden die beschreibenden Elemente in verschiedene Bereiche unterteilt, die für eine epigrafische Publikation infrage kommen. Wie aus den TEI-Modulen wurden auch hier die für das Projekt geeigneten Bereiche sondiert (vgl. Roueché & Flanders 2007-2014):

  • the edition of the epigraphic text itself: Es werden Anleitungen für die Beschreibung der Textstruktur, der Darstellungsform sowie der Texttranskription gegeben.
  • history of the discovery, documentation, and interpretation: Hier wird die Kodierung der bibliografischen Verweise erläutert. Eine Anforderung innerhalb des TWKM-Projektes ist es, bei den jeweiligen Inschriftenlesarten auf die Fachliteratur zu verweisen, in welcher diese Lesart genannt ist.

Die übrigen in EpiDoc angeführten Bereiche beziehen sich zum einen auf Informationen über die Inschriftenträger selbst (Fundhistorie etc.), zum anderen auf Elemente, die die Textanalyse betreffen. Da in dem Gesamtkonzept des Metadatenschemas die Daten zu den Inschriftenträgern in separaten Datencontainern geführt werden, wären sie an dieser Stelle redundant.

Diese Auswahl an Elementen wurde im Anschluss hinsichtlich der Anforderungen der Wissenschaftler geprüft: Welche Elemente gibt es für die Beschreibung der Inschriften-Textstruktur? Welche Elemente eignen sich für die Beschreibung der Hieroglyphen?

Bei der Erarbeitung des TEI-Schemas für die Wiedergabe der Struktur der Hieroglyphentexte zeigte sich Klärungsbedarf bezüglich der Fachtermini und der Forschungsrelevanz bestimmter Angaben. Wie ist die gebräuchlichste Bezeichnung bspw. der Seiten eines Inschriftenträgers, gibt es eine Vorder- und Rückseite? Wie kann der Bezug von Text und Bild hergestellt werden? Welche dieser Angaben gehören zu der sachlichen Wiedergabe des Inschriftentextes, welche sind bereits Interpretation? Und: Wie werden die einzelnen Hieroglyphen eindeutig angesprochen, ohne bereits eine Interpretation vorwegzunehmen?

Wiedergabe der Struktur des Inschriftentextes

Eine Herausforderung bei der Wiedergabe der Textstruktur ist die Vielzahl an Ausgestaltungsformen der Inschriftentexte, die es durch die Metadaten darzustellen gilt: die Anordnung der Hieroglyphenblöcke sowie die Form des Schriftfeldes an sich variiert (Tabelle 1).

Anordnung der Hieroglyphenblöcke Einzelkolumne
Doppelkolumne
Kombination von Einzel- und Doppelkolumne
Zeile
Kombination von Kolumne und Zeile
Initiale
Form der Schriftfelder rechteckig
Schriftband
Winkelförmig
Kartusche (d. h. mit Zierrahmen)
„Schriftbilder“ (Hieroglyphen als Bestandteil einer Abbildung)
Sprechblase

Tabelle 1: Übersicht der formalen Gestaltungsmöglichkeiten der Inschriften.

Um all diese Facetten durch die beschreibenden Daten abzudecken, wurde das Metadatenschema in aufeinander aufbauende Abschnitte gegliedert (Abbildung 2). Diese Aufteilung sollte die Auswahl der relevanten Metadatenelemente erleichtern und das Vorgehen transparenter für die weitere Nutzung gestalten. Im Folgenden werden die Elemente für die Beschreibung der ‚Inscription‘ sowie der drei Unterabschnitte ‚TextDivision‘, ‚Block‘ und ‚Sign‘ diskutiert und beschrieben.

Abbildung 2: Auszug aus dem Gesamtkonzept des Metadatenschemas (Farbige Markierung: TEI als Grundlage).

TEI-Elemente

Das Basispaar eines TEI-Elementes bilden der TEI-Header und ein Textelement. Der Header enthält Metadaten, die das Dokument als Ganzes beschreiben und kann sehr umfassend oder auch recht ‚schmal‘ gehalten werden. Das Textelement enthält die Metadaten des Dokuments selbst. Das Element <teiHeader> bildet mit seinen beschreibenden bzw. erklärenden Informationen sozusagen das elektronische Titelblatt, während das <text>-Element den Textinhalt des Objekts mit Annotationen, die dessen Struktur und weitere Eigenschaften deutlich machen, enthält.

<teiHeader>

Das <teiHeader>-Element muss nach den Vorgaben der TEI-P5-Guidelines mindestens das Element <fileDesc> (file description), das die elektronische Datei beschreibt, enthalten. Diesem Element sind wiederum drei obligate Elemente zugewiesen: <titleStmt>, <publicationStmt> und <sourceDesc>.

Das <title>-Subelement @type, mit dem auf alternative Namensformen verwiesen werden kann, ist an dieser Stelle redundant; in der Fachliteratur alternativ genannte Bezeichnungen für die Inschriftenträger werden in einem sogenannten Vokabular7)Die Vokabulare, die für das TWKM-Projekt erstellt werden, werden durch nach dem Simple Knowledge Organisation System (SKOS) kodiert. hinterlegt, sodass hier eine Beschränkung auf die gebräuchliche Bezeichnung ausreichend scheint.

Ebenso wird auf die Wiedergabe von Personen, die in Verbindung mit dem Objekt stehen, an dieser Stelle verzichtet. Diese Angaben werden in der CIDOC CRM-Kategorie ‚Actor‘ bzw. ‚Appellation‘ hinterlegt, die Verbindung zu dem Objekt wird in dem Metadatenschema über die eindeutige URI der TWKM-ID gewährleistet. Das bietet den Vorteil, dass Daten, die an anderer Stelle vorgehalten werden, nicht nochmals erstellt werden müssen. Ebenso verhält es sich mit den Objektdaten: Maße, Fundkontext, Datierung etc. können durch das Metadatenset von CIDOC CRM ausführlich und adäquat ausgezeichnet werden. Das bedeutet, dass für den teiHeader nur wenige Elemente genutzt werden, beispielsweise entfallen die Angaben <extent>, <notesStmt>, <author> oder auch <geoDecl> für die Fundkoordinaten – die Dateneingabe ist hier demnach gering und wenig aufwendig.

Für das TWKM-Projekt könnten das Element <teiHeader> demnach auf folgende Angaben reduziert werden:

<teiHeader>
 <fileDesc>
  <titleStmt>
   <title>[TWKM-ID]</title>
  </titleStmt>
  <publicationStmt>
   <authority>[name]</authority>
   <idno type="URI">[Verlinkung zu der Objekt-ID]</idno>
  </publicationStmt>
  <sourceDesc>
   <p>[z. B. Copan, Stele D]</p>
  </sourceDesc>
 </fileDesc>
</teiHeader>

Die Identifikationsnummer innerhalb des <publicationStmt>-Elements führt über einen Hyperlink zu dem jeweiligen Objekt selbst und damit zu allen den Inschriftenträger betreffenden Metadaten.

In den TextGrid-Empfehlungen werden zusätzlich <encodingDesc> (Beschreibung der Kodierung) und <editorialDecl> (Beschreibung der Editionsprinzipien) mit dem Element <normalization>, das den Grad der Vereinheitlichung und Normalisierung wiedergibt, angegeben (Vgl. Blümm & Wegstein 2008: 22f). Ob diese Elemente für das TWKM-Projekt an dieser Stelle praktikabel sind, ist zu prüfen.

Inscription

Für die Beschreibung der Inschriftentexte muss darstellbar sein, dass es mehrere Inschriften auf einem Objektträger geben kann und dass sich einzelne Texte auf Abbildungen beziehen können. Die Beschreibung der Inschriftentexte muss das Gesamtbild, also die Anordnung der Texte und zugehörender Abbildungen, widerspiegeln.

Vor der Beschreibung des Inschriftentextes wird – analog dem Beispiel von EpiDoc (vgl. Bodard 2007-2014) – auf das digitale Faksimile (Digitalisat eines Abriebes, einer Zeichnung oder eine Digitalfotografie) mit dem Element und der entsprechenden URI des Digitalisats verwiesen.

Die Inschrift wird durch das Tag <text>gekennzeichnet. Dieses Element enthält entweder einen einzelnen, eigenständigen oder einen aus mehreren Teilen bestehenden Text. Wenn mehrere Texte zusammengehören, wird das <text>-Element durch <group> umschlossen, um die Einheit darzustellen (vgl. TEI Consortium 2014, 150 und 1445). Dies könnte eventuell für die Beschreibung zweier zusammengehörender Fragmente für die Maya-Inschriften sinnvoll sein. Der Text selbst wird in dem Element <body> wiedergegeben, allerdings enthält dieses Element jeweils nur die eigenständigen Texte. D. h., dass ab dieser Beschreibungsebene ausschließlich die einzelnen Texte angesprochen werden.

Zwei weitere Elemente des Körpers sind <front> und <back>: <front> dient der Beschreibung aller Inhalte die vor dem eigentlichen Text stehen (z. B. Titelseite, Vorwort, Widmung), <back> alle Teile, die diesem angehängt sind. Es wäre allerdings denkbar, dass Einleitungsformeln oder auch Schlussformeln (z. B. die Nennung des Künstlers, der die Inschrift schuf), durch diese Elemente von der eigentlichen Textbeschreibung differenziert würde. Da dies bereits Interpretation der Inhalte darstellt, soll auf die Verwendung der Tags <front> und <back> verzichtet werden; für die Maya-Inschriften ist die Verwendung des <body>-Elements ausreichend.

Da die Maya-Texte an unterschiedlichen Stellen auf dem Objekt auftreten, wurde zunächst die Seite definiert. Für die Wissenschaftler ist es üblich, von Vorder- und Rückseite der Inschriftenträger zu sprechen. Als Vorderseite wird – soweit vorhanden – diejenige mit dem Herrscherbildnis bezeichnet, ansonsten die mit der Datumsangabe. Daraus ergeben sich die Seitenbezeichnungen: front, right, left, back. Allerdings sind diese Bezeichnungen nicht mit den TEI-Elementen, die bereits von der Verwendung ausgeschlossen wurden, zu verwechseln. Diese Spezifizierung ist Bestandteil des -Elements, nicht des <text>-Elements. Wenn es sich um einen zusammenhängenden Text handelt, der über mehrere Seiten läuft, ist die Spezifizierung Bestandteil der Textdivision (s. u.).

Im TWKM-Projekt wurden bereits Abkürzungen für die Beschreibung der Bilder festgelegt, die analog zur Beschreibung der Textfelder verwendet werden können, sodass eine einheitliche Ansprache entsteht:

Abkürzung für Erläuterung
f bzw. b front bzw. back Die Seite mit der Herrscherabbildung oder der Angabe des Datums gilt im Allgemeinen als Vorderseite. Geklärt werden muss hier, wie mit den Objekten zu verfahren ist, bei denen diese Angaben nicht bekannt/ersichtlich sind.
l bzw. r left bzw. right Die Seiten links und rechts ausgehend von der Vorderseite.
t bzw. u top bzw. underside Bezeichnung für die Ober- und Unterseite des Inschriftenträgers. Inschriften auf der Unterseite sind bspw. bei Türsturzen und der Standfläche von Keramik vorhanden.
g girth Wird für einen umlaufenden Text verwendet, bspw. bei zirkulären Altären.

Tabelle 2: Bezeichnungen für die Spezifizierung @type von <body>.

Ob die Bezeichnung ‚girth‘ auch bei Vasenabrollungen bzw. umlaufenden Texten verwendet werden soll, ist noch offen. Ebenso ist die Umsetzung für unregelmäßige Objekte, wie z. B. Inschriften auf Zoomorphen (Skulpturen in Tierform) oder in Höhlen, ungeklärt.

Eine besondere Herausforderung stellte die Umsetzung der variantenreichen Anordnungsmöglichkeiten der Hieroglyphenblöcke wie auch die der Schriftfeldformen dar; bei einer Kolumne bspw. muss eindeutig nachvollziehbar sein, an welcher Stelle eine neue Ziele beginnt, an welcher Stelle eine Kolumne endet und wo die Lesefolge in der nächsten Spalte beginnt. Vergleichbar ist dies mit dem Lesen einer Zeitung. Wie lassen sich Einzelkolumnen und Doppelkolumnen umsetzen? Ausgehend von diesen ‚einfachen‘ Beispielen wurde insgesamt nach einer Möglichkeit der Strukturwiedergabe gesucht. Diese Grundlage könnte dann für weitere Erscheinungsformen z. B. einen rechtwinkligen Text geprüft und erweitert werden.

TextDivision

‚TextDivision‘ bildet die Unterklasse zu ‚Inscription‘ und beschreibt einen ganz bestimmten Textabschnitt bzw. ein Textfeld auf einem Inschriftenträger. Für die Beschreibung eignet sich das Element <div> des TEI-Standards. Dieses Element kann entweder gezählt oder ungezählt verwendet werden. Die gezählte Variante spiegelt eine Hierarchie einzelner Textabschnitte wider, wobei <div1> die oberste Ebene, <div2> die nächstuntergeordnete usw. beschreibt. Da bei den Inschriftentexten keine Hierarchie der einzelnen Textabschnitte vorliegt und diese jeweils gleichwertig nebeneinander betrachtet werden, wird die Variante ohne Zählung gewählt. Klassifizierungen des Textes sind durch die Attribute @type bzw. @subtype möglich. So können beispielsweise einzelne Textteile separat beschreiben werden; analog zu dem Element <body> können die ‚Passagen‘ durch @n genauer definiert werden. Für die Klassifizierung ist die Unterscheidung nach Anordnungstypen sinnvoll (Tabelle 2). Allerdings wäre hierfür ein eindeutiges Vokabular zu erstellen, z. B. die Anordnungsmöglichkeiten der Hieroglyphenblöcke als Wert des Attributes @type und die Formenbeschreibung als Wert zu @subtype:

<div type="combination-column-line" subtype="right-angled">

Durch die Ergänzung einer Zählung, kann das entsprechende Textfeld innerhalb der Inschriftenseite genauer beschrieben werden:

<div n="B1-D3" type=“combination-column-line" subtype="right-angled">

Abbildung 3: Maya-Inschrift mit bildlichen Darstellungen und Beschriftung der Hieroglyphen (Rasterung); Yaxchilan, Türsturz 8.8)Nach Maler 1903: Tafel 52, die Blockbezeichnungen sind nach dem CMHI hinzugefügt.

In der Archäologie sind häufig auch nur Bruchstücke von Inschriftentexten vorhanden; die EpiDoc-Empfehlungen sehen hierfür den @type ‚fragment‘ vor, der der entsprechenden Beschreibung des Textabschnitts vorangestellt wird:

<div type="fragment">

Das Ende einer Kolumne wird durch <cb> (column break) getaggt. Zur Berücksichtigung der drei erhaltenen Inschriften-Kodizes ist zusätzlich die Beschreibung eines Seitenwechsels notwendig. Der Beginn einer neuen Seite wird durch <pb> (page break) ausgezeichnet.

In der Wissenschaft werden die einzelnen Hieroglyphenblöcke durch eine Rasterung vergleichbar der Aufteilung eines Schachbretts angesprochen; diese Bezeichnung muss sich in den TEI-Elementen wiederfinden. Unter Inscription wird die Gesamtrasterung der Inschrift wiedergegeben, sodass jede einzelne Hieroglyphe gezielt angesprochen werden kann, z. B. ist der Block D3 der Abbildung 3 eindeutig festgelegt. Bei dieser Rasterung kann es jedoch vorkommen, dass ein Block nicht eindeutig den beiden Koordinaten zuzuordnen ist bzw. dass auf einem Koordinatenpunkt zwei Blöcke stehen. In diesem Fall wird eine weitere Untergliederung gemacht, sodass die ‚Unterblöcke‘ bspw. als ‚A2a‘ und ‚A2b‘ bezeichnet werden. Mithilfe der ‚Koordinaten‘ kann die Grundstruktur der Inschrift beschrieben werden.

Der Bezug von Text und Bild ist sowohl auf Ebene des Textabschnitts als auf Ebene einzelner Blöcke relevant. Es gibt unterschiedliche Konstellationen: ein Textabschnitt kann sich insgesamt auf eine bildliche Darstellung beziehen, der Textabschnitte ist als ‚Sprechblase‘ zu einem Akteur zu betrachten oder die Blöcke bzw. ein Block befindet sich auf einem Akteur oder einem Gegenstand. Für die eindeutige Bezeichnung wird ein kontrolliertes Vokabular erstellt.

Bei der Überlegung, wie ein Text-Bild-Bezug beschrieben werden kann, kam der Vergleich mit der Gattung ‚Comic‘ auf. Eine Recherche ergab, dass es die auf TEI basierende Comic Book Markup Language (CBML; Walsh 2012) gibt. Für die Auszeichnung von ‚Sprechblasen‘ wird als Tag <balloon>9)„<balloon>“. In: Walsh 2012, http://dcl.slis.indiana.edu/cbml/schema/cbml.html#TEI.balloon (10.08.2014)., für einen zum Bild gehörenden Text <caption>10)„<caption>“. In: Walsh 2012, http://dcl.slis.indiana.edu/cbml/schema/cbml.html#TEI.caption (10.08.2014). in einem eigenen CBML-Modul eingeführt. Es wurde diskutiert, ob für die Beschreibung der Inschriftentexte und Abbildungen analog verfahren werden könnte; hierfür wäre entweder das CBML-Modul zu integrieren oder eine eigene Typisierung zu definieren. Allerdings ist <caption> auch in TEI definiert, sodass die TEI-Elemente evtl. ausreichen.

Nach den TEI-P5-Guidelines wurde die Wiedergabe von Text-Bild-Bezügen durch <figure> umgesetzt. Die bildliche Darstellung wird durch <graphic> und einer URL definiert. Eine Beschreibung des Bildes durch das Element <figDesc> ist nicht notwendig, da dies in den CIDOC CRM abgedeckt wird.

Beispiel:

<figure>
 <graphic url="..."/>
 <ab type="caption">[Schriftzeichen, die zu einem Bild gehören]</ab>
</figure>

Schriftzeichen auf Figurendarstellungen (Personen, Götter, Tiere) oder auf Gegenständen sind häufig. In einer Diskussion zeigte sich, dass es in der Darstellung wichtig ist, an welcher Stelle der Schriftpart steht: Auf dem Kopfschmuck ist er ein Zeichen für den Herrscher, Schriftzeichen auf dem Oberschenkel sind ausschließlich bei den Untergebenen (vgl. Abbildung 4) zu finden. Die Schrift ist hier demnach Ausdruck des soziokulturellen Gefüges und damit eine wichtige Information für die Forschung. Um die Unterscheidungen durch die Metadaten beschreiben zu können, wurde durch die Bonner Wissenschaftler ein weiteres Vokabular erstellt, das zur Spezifizierung durch das type-Attribut dient.

Abbildung 4: Hieroglyphen auf Personen zum Ausdruck der gesellschaftlichen Stellung (Auszug aus Yaxchilan, Türsturz 8).

Block

Eine Lösungsversuch für die Beschreibung der Blöcke sah eine Unterteilung des <div>-Elements durch ein definiertes Attribut mit Angaben der genauen Blockkoordinaten (z. B. A1) vor, sodass ein Block folgendermaßen beschreiben wäre: <div type="block" n="coordinates">. Nach dem gleichen Schema wäre das einzelne Logogramm oder Silbenzeichen als @subtype=sign definiert worden. Bereits beim Erarbeiten weiterer, relevanter Beschreibungskriterien wie bspw. die Hervorhebung einzelner Zeichen erwies sich dieser Ansatz als unbrauchbar. Nach den TEI-P5-Guidelines sind innerhalb des <div>-Elements sehr wenige Core-Elemente wie bspw. <gap> (Lücke) zulässig. Das benötigt Tag <hi> (highlighted) jedoch zur Kennzeichnung farbiger Blöcke ist nicht erlaubt. Daher musste ein anderer Lösungsweg gefunden werden.

Nach Durchsicht der Elemente und der Suche nach vergleichbaren Fällen in den Richtlinien von EpiDoc schien die Lösung, ein Element dazwischenzuschalten. Infrage kommen hierfür <l> (line) oder <ab> (anonymous block), wobei <l> gemäß den TEI-P5-Guidelines zur Beschreibung von Versen dient. Im Gegensatz zu <l> kann <ab> freier gestaltet werden, sodass dieses Element gewählt wird (vgl. TEI Consortium 2014: 508):

<div n=A type="column">
 <ab type="Block" n=A1>
  T1:257.1:624:178
 </ab>
 ...
</div>

Eine alternative Darstellung der Blöcke ermöglicht das Element <milestone>:

<milestone unit="block" n=A1>T1:257.1:624:178
<milestone unit="block" n=A2>...

Die Verwendung des <milestone>-Tags ist allerdings vor der Verwendung zu diskutieren. “Since it is not structural, validation of a reference system based on milestones cannot readily be checked by an XML parser, so it will be the responsibility of the encoder or the application software to ensure that they are given in the correct order” (TEI Consortium 2014, 114 f).

Für eine klarere Beschreibung der Struktur war es sinnvoll, Zeilenumbrüche auszuzeichnen. Hierfür wird das Element <lb> (line break) an der Stelle des ‚Zeilenendes‘ gesetzt, d. h. bei einer Doppelkolumne nach dem zweiten Hieroglyphenblock.

Eine Variante des TEI-Metadatenschemas für eine Doppelkolumne, deren erster Block größer dargestellt ist, könnte folgendermaßen aussehen:

<text>
 <body type="front">
  <div type="column" n=A>
   <ab type="block" n=A1.B1>
    <hi rend="tall">[Schriftzeichen]</hi>
   </ab>
   <ab type="block" n=A2>
    </lb>[Schriftzeichen]
   </ab>
   <ab type="block" n=B2>
    </lb>[Schriftzeichen]
   </ab> ...
  </div>
 </body>
</text>
Sign

Ein Hieroglyphenblock besteht i. d. R. aus drei bis vier (max. fünf) Zeichen in unterschiedlichen Zusammensetzungen. Die Wiedergabe der Leserichtung ist hierbei eine wichtige Anforderung. In der Wissenschaft hat sich hierfür ein Standard durchgesetzt, nach dem bspw. nebeneinander stehende Zeichen durch einen Punkt, übereinander stehende durch einen Doppelpunkt getrennt werden. Diese Konvention spiegelt ebenfalls wider, ob ein Zeichen vertikal oder horizontal in dem Block integriert ist; für die Wiedergabe der Zeichenanordnung kann dieser Standard verwendet werden11)Der im Antrag vorgesehenen Typisierung der Lesefolge wurde nicht weiter nachgegangen. Vgl. Grube 2011: Anlage 11..

Abbildung 5: Darstellung der Lesefolge einzelner Zeichen eines Hieroglyphenblocks (vgl. Grube 2011: 7).

Die Darstellung der Schriftzeichen des Klassischen Maya ist vielfältig und auch nach Region und Zeit unterschiedlich bzw. einem Wandel unterlegen. Daher war es notwendig, dass die Schriftzeichen jeweils mit der Originalschreibung verknüpft werden. Nur so können die Entwicklung und die Varianten der Zeichen greifbar gemacht werden. Für die Wiedergabe des Inschriftentextes wurden nach der in der Wissenschaft gängigen Methode die Zeichen durch eine Klassifikation dargestellt: z. B. T178 wäre nach der Klassifikation von Thompson die Wiedergabe der Silbe la. In diesem Bereich liegt bereits der Übergang zu einer Interpretation der Zeichen vor und ist daher kritisch zu sehen.

Neben der Klassifikation von Thompson gibt es noch Weitere, die für das TWKM-Projekt in einer eigenen Zeichenkonkordanz zusammengeführt und ergänzt werden sollten. Die Zeichen erhalten eine eindeutige Identifikationsnummer, die später vorrangig verwendet wird. Die Konkordanz wird im Laufe des TWKM-Projektes erstellt und nach Bedarf erweitert: Nicht interpretierbare Schriftzeichen werden nicht durch ein Fragezeichen beschrieben, sondern erhalten bereits eine eindeutige Nummer innerhalb der Konkordanz; die Lesung, Transkription etc. können je nach Kenntnisstand ergänzt werden. Da die Nummer jeweils der standardisierten Zeichenform zugewiesen wird, müssten auch die jeweiligen Schreibvarianten eine eigene ID erhalten, da nur so die Verbindung der Schreibvariante zum zeitlichen und geografischen Gebrauch hergestellt werden kann. Dies erlaubt, dass in der Beschreibung durch die Metadaten stets eine eindeutige Nummer verwendet werden kann; dadurch können – wie in den Anforderungen verlangt – nicht entzifferte Textstellen mit Verweis auf die Originalschreibung berücksichtigt werden. Für die Umsetzung der Zahlzeichen, die eine eigene Kategorie innerhalb der Maya-Schrift darstellen, lag noch keine Lösung vor, sodass sich nach dem aktuellen Stand nicht alle Datierungen in den Inschriften wiedergeben ließen.

Denkbar wäre, die Konkordanz nach TEI bspw. gemäß einer Taxonomie zu beschreiben (vgl. TEI Consortium 2014: 46f). Die einzelnen Schriftzeichen ließen sich demnach mit einer ID ansprechen. In der Beschreibung würde dann bspw. das Attribut xml:id="I156" für eine TWKM-Nummer gleichgesetzt.

Für die Beschreibung der Zeichen nach der Originalvorlage können eventuell die TEI-Elemente <g> bzw. <glyph> (Referenz zu <g>) verwendet werden, die insbesondere für Zeichen eingesetzt werden, für die kein Unicode existiert (vgl. TEI Consortium 2014: 181). Die EpiDoc-Empfehlungen beschränken sich darauf, <g> nur zu verwenden „where a symbol is non meaning-bearing“, in einem folgenden @type-Attribut wird das Symbol beschrieben, bspw. ein Kruzifix12)“Symbol (Non meaning-bearing)”. In: EpiDoc-Guidelines. http://www.stoa.org/epidoc/gl/latest/trans-symbol.html (22.07.2014).. Denkbar wäre ein TWKM-Projekt-spezifisches Modul für die Konkordanz, das ähnlich dem XML-Schema zur Beschreibung des Tags <glyph> strukturiert ist.

Da in der Wiedergabe der Zeichen eine Interpretation vorliegt, ist es wichtig, jede Lesart mittels einer Verweisung auf die Sekundärliteratur zu belegen. Für die Sekundärliteratur wird ein Verzeichnis mit dem quelloffenen Literaturverwaltungsprogramm Zotero angelegt; Zotero erlaubt einen Datenexport in das TEI-Format. Die Verweisung auf einen entsprechenden Eintrag erfolgt durch das <ref>-Tag, das auf den entsprechenden Eintrag in dem Literaturverzeichnis verlinkt:

<ref target="#Stuart 2008">158-159</ref>

Fehlende und nicht lesbare Textstellen, Hieroglyphen und Zeichen

Lücken im Text können auf allen drei Unterabschnitten im Inschriftentext dargestellt werden, je nach Umfang der fehlenden Textstelle, d. h. innerhalb der Beschreibungen von <div>, <block> und auch <sign>. Sie werden jeweils durch das Element <gap> eingeleitet und durch ein Attribut genauer definiert. Nach den TEI-P5-Guidelines sind die Attribute optional, allerdings ist es sinnvoll hier den EpiDoc-Empfehlungen zu folgen, die das Attribut @reason verbindlich vorgeben. Als Werte sind ‚lost‘, ‚illegible‘, ‚omitted‘ und ‚elipsis‘ vorgesehen13)“<gap>”. In: EpiDoc-Guidelines. http://www.stoa.org/epidoc/gl/latest/ref-gap.html (15.08.2014).. EpiDoc bietet sehr umfassende Vorgaben zur Beschreibung nicht darzustellender Textstellen. Unter anderem ist es möglich, auch die Quantität einer Lücke, soweit bekannt, anzugeben:

<gap reason="illegible" quantity="1" unit="block"/>

Das in wissenschaftlichen Publikationen verwendete sogenannte Leidener Klammersystem wird auch in der Maya-Forschung zur Umsetzung der Originalinschrift verwendet, wodurch Textlücken sowie deren Quantität dargestellt werden können. Somit bietet sich eine Verwendung der EpiDoc-Implementierung für die Umsetzung des Leidener Klammersystems an.

Kritische Betrachtung des Metadatenschemas

Durch die kleinteilige Untergliederung der Inschrift besteht die Gefahr, dass die TEI-Struktur unübersichtlich wird – hier ist zu überlegen, ob Elemente weggelassen werden können, und dennoch dasselbe Ergebnis erzielt wird. Oder ob für die unterschiedlichen Anordnungsmöglichkeiten (Einzel-, Doppelkolumne etc.) eine jeweils angepasste Auswahl an Elementen definiert werden sollte (vergleichbar mit den TEI-P5-Guidelines mit den Unterteilungen nach Textgattung). Es ist sinnvoll, mehrere optionale Elemente zu definieren, sodass je nach Bedarf aus dem Set ausgewählt werden kann.

Ein Vergleich mit den Anforderungen der Wissenschaftler, die im Laufe des Projektes formuliert wurden, zeigte, dass das Elemente-Set diese zu einem hohen Grad abdeckt. Nicht gelöst war die Problematik, die Zeichen als Einzelbestandteile der Blöcke eindeutig zu identifizieren. Nach der aktuellen Auszeichnung werden die Zeichen hintereinander vergleichbar einem Fließtext geschrieben. Die Zeichenkonkordanz, die die einzelnen Zeichen und deren jeweiligen Varianten mittels einer xml:id auszeichnet, kann hier Abhilfe schaffen. Dadurch wäre auch die Berechnung der Anzahl aller in einer Inschrift enthalten Zeichen möglich. Für die Beschreibung der Zeichen gibt es unterschiedliche Möglichkeiten: Es konnte mit Abschluss dieses Projektes noch nicht entschieden werden, ob sich das Element <g> bzw. <glyph> oder <milestone> für die Auszeichnung der einzelnen Zeichen eignet. Evtl. kann hier, nach der Erstellung der Konkordanz, eine praktikable Lösung gefunden werden. Die geforderte Trennung von reiner Textbeschreibung und Interpretation war nicht möglich, da für die einzelnen Zeichen keine eindeutig kodierte Sprache vorliegt; weil die Schrift und Sprache des Klassischen Maya noch nicht gänzlich erforscht ist, waren zum Teil noch keine eindeutigen Zuweisungen erfolgt.

Fraglich war, ob die Wiedergabe der Anordnung der Schriftzeichen innerhalb eines Blockes durch den bisherigen Standard (Punkt für zwei nebeneinanderstehende Zeichen usw.) für die Forschung ausreicht oder ob hierfür eine präzise Auszeichnung, die eine gezielte Abfrage ermöglicht, notwendig ist. Evtl. könnte auch die in dem TWKM-Projektantrag genannte Typisierung der Zeichenanordnung eine gute Lösung bieten (vgl. Grube 2011: Anlage 11).

Da zu den Texten oftmals Abbildungen gehören, die für eine Deutung und damit die Interpretation des Textinhaltes äußerst relevant sind, wurden für die Auszeichnung der bildlichen Darstellungen zu wenige Elemente genutzt. Größenverhältnisse von Abbildungen bzw. die Angabe der genauen Position waren nach derzeitigem Stand nicht möglich. Um die genaue Position zu bezeichnen und auch leere Flächen aufzuzeigen, müsste für die Objekte eine weitere Rasterung definiert werden, das nicht nur die Hieroglyphen durch Koordinaten festlegt, sondern immer in gleichem Seitenverhältnis für alle Inschriften gilt. So könnten die bildlichen Darstellungen eindeutig beschrieben und evtl. daraus das Größenverhältnis ermittelt werden.

Die Auswahl der Elemente kann als Grundlage zur weiteren Ausarbeitung dienen; bis zu der endgültigen Fertigstellung werden vermutlich noch weitere Aspekte berücksichtigt werden müssen – in den Diskussion werden stets neue Anforderungen bzw. Schwierigkeiten identifiziert. Des Weiteren ist zu erörtern, ob dieses Metadatenschema auch seltene Formen der Inschriftentexte, die nicht in den verfügbaren Beispielen thematisiert wurden, beschreiben kann. Sobald auf dieser Arbeitsgrundlage die optimale Darstellung der Zeichen entschieden ist, kann im Anschluss die Transkription und Transliteration der Zeichen, die ebenfalls in TEI beschrieben werden sollen, erfolgen.

Das Metadatenschema zeigt, dass die Attribute der TEI-P5-Guidelines für die Erfassung der Inschriftentexte zusätzlicher Anpassungen bspw. bezüglich der Attributwerte bedarf; häufig wurden die Präzisierungen der EpiDoc-Richtlinien herangezogen. Allerdings scheinen insbesondere bei der Beschreibung des Bild-Text-Bezuges TWKM-spezifische Anpassungen notwendig. Die Auswahl an Elementen zeigt zudem, dass das Schema aus einem Mix unterschiedlicher TEI-Module besteht; nur so konnten die verschiedenen Aspekte der Inschriftentexte berücksichtigt werden.

Fazit

Die Einarbeitung für dieses Projekt verfolgte zwei sehr komplexe Stränge: ein Grundverständnis des Klassischen Maya ist Voraussetzung, um den Diskussionen der Wissenschaftler dieses Bereichs folgen und die Anforderungen nachvollziehen zu können. Zum anderen ist die (Grund-)Kenntnis des Formats TEI unerlässlich. Hier zeigt sich, dass die Vorauswahl nach Modulen für einen ersten Überblick hilfreich war. Sowohl die TEI-Module als auch die Abschnitte der EpiDoc-Empfehlungen erleichtern die Auseinandersetzung mit dieser bislang fremden Materie. Die TEI-P5-Guidelines erlauben einen schnellen Einstieg und in der Online-Version ein schnelles Suchen nach einzelnen Elementen, die stets mit Beispielen die Verwendungsmöglichkeiten aufzeigen. Allerdings war es schwierig, Pflichtelemente eines Moduls zu identifizierten: aus der Übersicht der Einzelelemente geht nicht hervor, welches Element in der Hierarchie darunter obligat und welches optional ist. Darauf wird nur in den Ausführungen der Guidelines hingewiesen. Daher ist es stets notwendig, die jeweiligen Kapitel der ausgewählten Elemente zu prüfen14)Bei Verwendung eines XML-Editors wie z. B. von oXygen können die Daten leicht auf Validität und Wohlgeformtheit geprüft werden.. Bei Problemen, für die die EpiDoc-Empfehlungen keine Lösungen anboten, ergab auch die Recherche bei anderen Projekten, die Inschriften digital erschließen, keinen weiteren Aufschluss, wie bspw. bei der Umsetzung der einzelnen Zeichen. Dennoch zeigt das Beispiel der ‚Comic book markup language‘, dass es nicht nur bei epigrafischen Projekten evtl. Lösungsansätze gibt.

Der regelmäßige Austausch zwischen allen Projektbeteiligten war eine Grundvoraussetzung für das Gelingen eines solchen Projektes – nicht in dem Metadatenschema oder bei der technischen Infrastruktur (Layout, Suchfunktionen etc.) berücksichtigte Anforderungen sind später nur mit großem Aufwand zu korrigieren. Daher war zu Beginn eine eher feingliedrige und sorgfältige Zusammenarbeit wichtig. In den Treffen des TWKM-Projektteams kristallisierte sich schrittweise heraus, welche Daten und Informationen für die Umsetzung des TWKM-Projektes von Bedeutung sind.

Die Erarbeitung des Metadatenkonzepts insgesamt zeigte, dass dieser Bereich große Übereinstimmungen mit der bibliothekarischen Erschließung aufweist: Die Ansetzung normierter Daten für die Namen, das Erstellung kontrollierter Vokabulare und das Erkennen von gemeinsamen Strukturen innerhalb der Daten sind aus der Formal- und Sacherschließung sowie der Ansetzung von Normdaten in Wissenschaftlichen Bibliotheken zu finden – auch wenn die Auszeichnungssprachen für das TWKM-Projekt in Wissenschaftlichen Universalbibliotheken vermutlich kaum eine Rolle spielen15)Nach den DFG-Praxisregeln zur Digitalisierung von 2009 soll für die Erschließung mittelalterlicher Handschriften das TEI-Format verwendet werden (vgl. dort. S. 18). U. a. die Herzog-August-Bibliothek in Wolfenbüttel sowie die Universitätsbibliothek Heidelberg folgen dieser Empfehlung.. Ein Blick über den Tellerrand lohnt sich auch für Bibliothekare, da sie durch ihre Expertise Forschungsvorhaben aus dem Bereich der sogenannten Digital Humanities sinnvoll unterstützen könnten.

Literatur- und Quellenverzeichnis

Arbeitsstelle Altägyptisches Wörterbuch
n.d. Thesaurus Linguae Aegyptiae. Berlin Brandenburgische Akademie der Wissenschaften. http://aaew.bbaw.de/tla/index.html.
Blümm, Mirjam, and Werner Wegstein
2008 The TEI header for Texts in Baseline Encoding. In TextGrid’s Baseline Encoding for Text Data in TEI P5 (2007-2009), edited by Mirjam Blümm et al., pp. 19–27. http://www.textgrid.de/fileadmin/TextGrid/reports/baseline-all-en.pdf.
Bodard, Gabriel
2007 Structure of an EpiDoc Edition. In EpiDoc Guidelines: Ancient documents in TEI XML (Version 8), edited by Tom Elliott, Gabriel Bodard, and Hugh Cayless. http://www.stoa.org/epidoc/gl/latest/supp-structure.html.
Elliott, Tom, Gabriel Bodard, and Hugh Cayless
2006 EpiDoc: Epigraphic Documents in TEI XML. http://epidoc.sf.net.
Gronemeyer, Sven
1999 Das Schriftsystem der Maya. Hausarbeit im Rahmen des Proseminars „Schriftsysteme Amerikas“. http://www.sven-gronemeyer.de/research/schrift.html.
Grube, Nikolai
1993 Schrift und Sprache der Maya. In Die Welt der Maya, edited by Reiss-Museum der Stadt Mannheim. 3rd ed. Zabern, Mainz.
2011 Textdatenbank und Wörterbuch des Klassischen Maya (TWKM). Antrag für ein Forschungsprojekt im Rahmen des Forschungsprogramms der Deutschen Akademien der Wissenschaften (Akademieprogramm) für 2013. Bonn.
Grube, Nikolai, and Maria Gaida
2006 Die Maya: Schrift und Kunst. SMB-DuMont, Berlin & Köln.
Maler, Teobert
1903 Researches in the Central Portion of the Usumatsintla Valley: Reports of Explorations for the Museum. Vol. 2. Memoirs of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University 2. Peabody Museum, Cambridge, MA.
Pennsylvania Sumerian Dictionary
n.d. The Pennsylvania Sumerian Dictionary. University of Pennsylvania. http://psd.museum.upenn.edu/epsd1/index.html.
Reynolds, Joyce, Charlotte Roueché, and Gabriel Bodard
2007 Inscriptions of Aphrodisias (2007). http://insaph.kcl.ac.uk/iaph2007.
Roueché, Charlotte, and Julia Flanders
2007 Gentle Introduction to Mark-up for Epigraphers. In EpiDoc Guidelines: Ancient documents in TEI XML (Version 8), edited by Tom Elliott, Gabriel Bodard, and Hugh Cayless. http://www.stoa.org/epidoc/gl/latest/intro-eps.html.
TEI Consortium
n.d. Projects Using the TEI. http://www.tei-c.org/Activities/Projects/.
n.d. TEI: Frequently Asked Questions. http://www.tei-c.org/release/doc/tei-p5-doc/en/html/TitlePageVerso.html.
2014 TEI P5: Guidelines for Electronic Text Encoding and Interchange. Version 2.6.0., 20.01.2014. http://www.tei-c.org/Guidelines/P5/.
Walsh, John A.
2012 Comic book markup language. School of Library and Information Science, Indiana University. http://dcl.slis.indiana.edu/cbml/.
Werning, Daniel A.
2013 Datenkodierung in TEI XML im Rubensohn-Projekt (Arbeitsbericht). http://www.gwdg.de/~dwernin/drafts/Werning-TEI_im_Rubensohn_Projekt.pdf.

Footnotes   [ + ]

1. Thesaurus Linguae Aegyptiae. Arbeitsstelle Altägyptisches Wörterbuch. Berlin-Brandenburgische Akademie der Wissenschaften. http://aaew.bbaw.de/tla/index.html (04.08.2014).
2. Pennsylvania Sumerian Dictionary. University of Pennsylvania. http://psd.museum.upenn.edu/epsd1/index.html (04.08.2014).
3. Vgl. “TEI: Frequently Asked Questions”. TEI Consortium. http://www.tei-c.org/release/doc/tei-p5-doc/en/html/TitlePageVerso.html (04.08.2014).
4. Um die Unterscheidung der beiden Projekte zu erleichtern, wird im Folgenden das Rahmenprojekt als TWKM-Projekt bezeichnet.
5. Vgl. “Projects Using the TEI.” TEI Consortium. http://www.tei-c.org/Activities/Projects/ (04.08.2014) und Reynolds, Roueché & Godard 2007, http://insaph.kcl.ac.uk/iaph2007/.
6. Das CIDOC Conceptual Reference Model (CRM) stellt ein Dokumentationsformat für den Bereich des Kulturellen Erbes dar und ist seit 2006 offizieller ISO-Standard (ISO 21127:2006). Dieses Format wurde gewählt, um die zahlreichen Aspekte, wie bspw. Fundhistorie, Aufbewahrungshistorie, Personen wie Ausgräber, Kuratoren etc., die sich auf das Objekt selbst beziehen, adäquat abbilden zu können.
7. Die Vokabulare, die für das TWKM-Projekt erstellt werden, werden durch nach dem Simple Knowledge Organisation System (SKOS) kodiert.
8. Nach Maler 1903: Tafel 52, die Blockbezeichnungen sind nach dem CMHI hinzugefügt.
9. „<balloon>“. In: Walsh 2012, http://dcl.slis.indiana.edu/cbml/schema/cbml.html#TEI.balloon (10.08.2014).
10. „<caption>“. In: Walsh 2012, http://dcl.slis.indiana.edu/cbml/schema/cbml.html#TEI.caption (10.08.2014).
11. Der im Antrag vorgesehenen Typisierung der Lesefolge wurde nicht weiter nachgegangen. Vgl. Grube 2011: Anlage 11.
12. “Symbol (Non meaning-bearing)”. In: EpiDoc-Guidelines. http://www.stoa.org/epidoc/gl/latest/trans-symbol.html (22.07.2014).
13. “<gap>”. In: EpiDoc-Guidelines. http://www.stoa.org/epidoc/gl/latest/ref-gap.html (15.08.2014).
14. Bei Verwendung eines XML-Editors wie z. B. von oXygen können die Daten leicht auf Validität und Wohlgeformtheit geprüft werden.
15. Nach den DFG-Praxisregeln zur Digitalisierung von 2009 soll für die Erschließung mittelalterlicher Handschriften das TEI-Format verwendet werden (vgl. dort. S. 18). U. a. die Herzog-August-Bibliothek in Wolfenbüttel sowie die Universitätsbibliothek Heidelberg folgen dieser Empfehlung.

Evaluating the Digital Documentation Process from 3D Scan to Drawing

Working Paper 2

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.20376/IDIOM-23665556.15.wp002.en

Sven Gronemeyer1,2, Christian Prager1 & Elisabeth Wagner1

1 Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität, Bonn
2 La Trobe University, Melbourne

The “Text Database and Dictionary of Classic Mayan” project acquired a Breuckmann smartSCAN C5 structured-light scanner for high-resolution and three-dimensional documentation of Maya artefacts with inscriptions. Renderings of the stereolithographic mesh can be used to create (digital) line drawings for the project’s repository. This working paper exemplifies the workflow of creating a drawing on the basis of a mesh (rather than describing the scanning and mesh generation process themselves) in order to evaluate a best practice and define standards for the project.

Scanning and 3D Mesh Rendering

A fibre glass replica of the left slab of the Tablet of the Sun from Palenque was used as a case study for the documentation process. This cast is part of the collection of the Bonner Altamerika-Sammlung (BASA) at the University of Bonn. It was made from the same mould that was previously used for the cast made by Maudslay (1889: pl. 87). To imitate the original surface, the replica was coated with a yellow-brownish paint mixed with small particles, imitating a surface of porous stone. The scanner’s M-850 sensor was used for the scanning process. It has a field of view size of 650 x 560 mm with a 27° triangulation angle. The lateral resolution (X,Y) is 265 µm and the depth resolution (Z) is 15 µm. A series of 17 raw shots was assembled into a merged mesh, with a total of nearly 6.55 million vertices and 13.06 million faces, and saved in the binary polygon file format (PLY) in Breuckmann’s Optocat software.

In the next step, the mesh was processed with the Open Source software Meshlab to produce a rendering suitable as a basis for the line drawing. After aligning the model to an isometric view of the relief, the colour information was deactivated, leaving the mesh un-textured. This makes the outlines of the surface more visible, but a Phong illumination (Phong 1975) still retains shadows and the plasticity of the original surface. As a last step, a Lambertian radiance scaling (Vergne et al. 2011) shader was applied with maximum enhancement to reduce specular lights for a matte surface, to highlight and „flatten“ relief contours, and to provide a rendering with sufficient contrast to facilitate tracing of carved outlines. The rendering was then exported as a high-resolution snapshot.

Figure 1. Courtesy Bonner Altamerika-Sammlung (BASA) – Meshes by Sven Gronemeyer, 2015 – left: Textured full-colour Phong rendering, center: Uncoloured Phong rendering, right: Lambertian radiance scaled rendering

Image Processing

The snapshot can, of course, be printed out in a preferable size and the line drawing then completed using ink and paper, but a more desirable option is further digital processing and drawing. For this purpose, the project offers each epigraphic team member a Wacom Cintiq 24″ HD interactive pen display and a variety of graphic suites as per individual preference. One of the major advantages of an image editing software is the possibility of creating multiple layers for the mesh, the drawing, and the background. This leaves the artist the freedom to divide the drawing into custom segments of various granularity, e.g. creating layers for each individual glyph block or iconographic feature. For the Tablet of the Sun showpiece, it was decided to arrange layers for (a) the mesh rendering, (b) the feature outlines of thicker line width, (c) the inner contours of thinner line width, and (d) the background(s) of blank spaces in the relief. The drawing thus follows the technique established as the standard for the Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions (Graham 1975: fn. 4).

Figure 2. Different Drawing Layers of the Palenque Tablet of the Sun – Drawings by Sven Gronemeyer, 2015 – left: mesh and outline drawing, center: drawing without background, right: drawing with background stippling

The layer organisation does not only facilitate the drawing process. Within the team, layers can also help team members discuss interpretations in the drawing process and propose corrections or amendments. Layers additionally ensure stringent quality control in a collaborative work flow. But, above all, a drawing layer on top of the mesh rendering provides more transparency to other colleagues by allowing direct comparison between the rendering of the scanned object and the artist’s treatment of surface features, at least by using the radiance scaled image in the background. While tracing on this basis, the artist still has the possibility to simultaneously view the 3D mesh from different angles with different illumination settings and shaders, and to dynamically inspect surface features that become fixed in the snapshot.

A final comment can be made on the background filling. The method of stippling the background to highlight the carved areas was of course necessary when using ink and paper. In digital image processing, however, a mask of the outlines can easily be produced and filled with a range of uniform, grey colours. A major argument in favour of this method is time: in the present example, the stippling required about 20 hours of work, although it is admittedly rather dense. Filling the mask, in contrast, took only about 30 minutes. A grey background is also not expected to be problematic for modern print technologies, and layers furthermore allow different output options to suit any reproduction requirement, whether online or in print. In total, about 50 hours were needed to finalise the drawing.

Recommendations

Based on the experience working with the Tablet of the Sun showpiece, the project proposes the following guidelines for generating line drawings based on 3D scans:

  • Create a high-resolution snapshot of the prepared mesh rendering; its physical dimensions depend on the size of the object
  • Assign a layer to the rendering, making it the lowest level on top of a white background
  • Assign each major feature (e.g. glyph block or figure) different layers for outer and inner lines; the thinnest line width should be no less than 5 pixels
  • Create a mask to contain the background filling: 20% black is recommended (= Hex #CCCCCC = RGB 204)
  • Leave the interior of glyph blocks, iconographic features, frames, and eroded/destroyed areas white

Figure 3. Final Drawing of the Palenque Tablet of the Sun – Drawing by Sven Gronemeyer, 2015

The proposals are based on a stone monument in low relief, and different shades of grey may be introduced to represent different levels of background (as on e.g. Yaxchilan Lintel 14), similar to how the density of stippling was used in the past. The same recommendation may apply for tracing erosion or damage to the relief ground.

Summary

The scanning and subsequent mesh rendering revealed that the fibre glass replica still yields a considerable level of detail that may not be initially apparent on the actual physical object (partly because of the paint coating). Comparison with existing line drawings made from the original object now in the Museo Nacional de Antropología in Mexico City shows great similarities, but also reveals features not previously recognised by other artists.

Figure 4. Comparison between previous drawings – left: Drawing by Annie Hunter (Maudslay 1889: pl. 88), center: Drawing by Linda Schele (Schele 1976: fig. 12), right: Drawing by Merle Greene Robertson (Robertson 1991: fig. 95)

One example is the correction of a grapheme that appears twice on the monument, as well as in block I1 in the secondary text on the left slab. While previous artists rendered the collocation as ko-bu-yi, a close inspection of the scan reveals ju-bu-yi, which is, of course, the spelling of the mediopassive form jub-uy-i „it gets down“, an interpretation which had already been applied to this phrase in the past based on the context (e.g. Stuart 2006: 171).

Figure 5. Comparison between photo and 3D scan, blocks C1-D6

The advantages of a detailed, isometric rendering of a 3D scan can be seen in directly comparing a photo of the plaster cast (Maudslay 1889: pl. 87) and a Lambertian radiance scaling rendering of the fibre glass replica produced from the same mould. In contrast to the photo, the rendering is matte and shows no shadows. Together with the contour highlighting, it allows a more precise tracing of the carved outlines in the drawing process. In fact, the radiance scaling of the scan of the cast also led to a new reading and interpretation (Wagner, Gronemeyer & Prager 2015) of a crucial text passage.

References

Graham, Ian
1975 Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions, Volume 1: Introduction to the Corpus. Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA.
Maudslay, Alfred P.
1889 Biologia Centrali-Americana, or, Contributions to the Knowledge of the Fauna and Flora of Mexico and Central America. Archaeology. R. H. Porter and Dulau & co., London.
Phong, Bui Thuong
1975 Illumination for Computer Generated Pictures. Communications of the Association for Computing Machinery 18(6): 311–317.
Robertson, Merle G.
1991 The Cross Group, the North Group, the Olvidado, and Other Pieces. The Sculpture of Palenque 4. Princeton University Press, Princeton, N.J.
Schele, Linda
1976 Accession Iconography of Chan-Bahlum in the Group of the Cross at Palenque. In The Art, Iconography and Dynastic History of Palenque, Part III, edited by Merle G. Robertson, pp. 9–34. The Proceedings of the Segunda Mesa Redonda de Palenque. Pre-Columbian Art Research, Robert Louis Stevenson School, Pebble Beach, CA.
Stuart, David S.
2006 Sourcebook for the 30th Maya Hieroglyphic Forum at Texas. Department of Art and Art History, the College of Fine Arts, and the Institute of Latin American Studies, Austin.
Vergne, Romain, Romain Pacanowski, Pascal Barla, Pascal Granier, and Christophe Schlick
2011 Radiance Scaling for Versatile Surface Enhancement. In Proceedings of the Symposium on Interactive 3D Graphics and Games, February 2010, Boston, United States, edited by I3D ’10. Boston, MA. https://hal.inria.fr/inria-00449828/file/RadianceScaling.pdf
Wagner, Elisabeth, Sven Gronemeyer, and Christian M. Prager
2015 Tz’atz’ Nah, a “New” Term in the Classic Maya Lexicon. Vol. 2. Textdatenbank und Wörterbuch des Klassischen Maya Research Note. Nordrhein-Westfälische Akademie der Wissenschaften und der Künste & Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn, Bonn.

Überblick über die Dokumentation

banner_documentation

Zur Erreichung des Ziels einer lexikalischen Datenbank des Klassischen Maya dokumentiert das Projekt neben den eigentlichen textuellen Informationen weitere Parameter zum Aufbau der Korpusdatenbank. Hierzu zählen etwa die Fundstätten oder Museumssammlungen mit Textträgern, eine Konkordanz von Zeichenkatalogen, eine epigraphische und archäologische Bibliographie, und andere Hilfsmittel.

Diese Listen werden im Laufe des Projektes online verfügbar gemacht und laufend ergänzt und aktualisiert, so dass alle Daten vollumfänglich Open Access zugänglich sind. Neben einer komfortablen Suchfunktion bieten wir den Export der Daten in verschiedene Formate an.

Entzifferungsgeschichte

Grundlagen

Die phonetische Entzifferung der Mayaschrift gelang erst in den 1950er Jahren, während dieser Ansatz erst in den 1980er Jahren eine breite Akzeptanz fand und das etablierte Paradigma wurde. Der Schlüssel zum Verständnis der Mayaschrift wurde aber bereits im 16. Jahrhundert gelegt, als der franziskanische Bischof von Yucatan, Diego de Landa, eine Rechtfertigungsschrift verfasste, die Relación de las cosas de Yucatán, als gegen ihn ein Prozess wegen Übergriffe auf die Mayabevölkerung angestrengt wurde.

Diese 1566 verfasste Ethnographie verschwand nach Ende des Prozesses in den Archiven der spanischen Kolonialverwaltung, eine gekürzte Abschrift des Originals wurde dort erst 1862 durch den französischen Theologen Charles Étienne Brasseur de Bourbourg wiederentdeckt. In mehreren Kapiteln behandelt Landa den Kalendar und auch das Schriftsystem, unterstützt durch seine Informanten Gaspar Antonio Chi und Juan Nachi Cocom, Abkömmlinge yukatekischer Herrscherhäuser. Zum ersten Mal waren damit die Zeichen des Kalenders mit ihren (yukatekischen) Lautwerten offenbart, und Brasseur konnte das System der Punkt-Strich-Schreibweise der Zahlen erarbeiten, welches 30 Jahre zuvor bereits von Constantine Samuel Rafinesque-Schmaltz erkannt wurde.

Landa Alphabet after Brasseur 1869

Landas „Alphabet“ der Mayaschrift in einer Umzeichnung von Brasseur de Bourbourg (1869)

Nebst einigen Beispielen gab Landa auch ein „Abc“ der Mayaschrift, das aber mit keinem anderen Alphabet vergleichbar wäre, so enthält es drei Zeichen für „A“, zwei für „B“, „L“, „O“, „X“ und „U“ und sogar einige Zeichen die mit einem syllabischen Wert wie „CA“, „CU“ oder „KU“ bezeichnet sind. Da Brasseur ohne Kenntnis der Leserichtung interpretierte, waren seine Lesungsversuche einzelner Hieroglyphenblöcke anhand dieses „Abc“ in den Handschriften zum Scheitern verurteilt. Obwohl frühere Gelehrte wie Rafinesque-Schmaltz oder der amerikanische Forschungsreisende John Lloyd Stephens vermutet hatten, dass die Schrift mit den Mayasprachen verknüpft sein müsse, ignorierte Brasseur die Tatsache, dass seine Lesungen keine sinnvollen Mayawörter ergaben. Brasseur de Bourbourgs Verdienst für die Mayaforschung besteht darin, zahlreiche kolonialzeitliche Wörterbücher, Grammatiken und Texte in verschiedenen Mayasprachen in Archiven und Privatbesitz aufgespürt und diese in verschiedenen Publikationen der Öffentlichkeit zugänglich gemacht zu haben.

Auch wenn isolierte Lesungen, etwa 1876 die der Himmelsrichtungen durch Léon Luis de Rosny, in der Folgezeit vollbracht wurden, bestand die Mayaforschung aus zwei Lagern: jenen, die einen phonetischen Ansatz vertraten und Landas „Abc“ anwenden wollten und jenen, die eine Bilderschrift vermuteten. Hingegen vertrat de Rosny die These, wie auch andere Forscher, etwa der amerikanische Anthropologe Cyrus Thomas, wonach die Mayaschrift eine Kombination beider Systeme darstelle – eine Annahme die aber nicht durchsetzungsfähig war. Wieder andere, wie zum Beispiel der US-Anthropologe Daniel Brinton gingen von einer Rebusschrift aus und verglichen die Mayaschrift mit der aztekischen Schrift (die aber letztlich ebenfalls phonetisch ist). Léon de Rosny und Cyrus Thomas waren bedeutende Vordenker des phonetischen Ansatzes und ihre Veröffentlichungen enthalten Entzifferungen, wie zum Beispiel die Lesung der Hieroglyphe kutzu für „Truthahn“ (Tafel II, 34-35), moo „Arakanga“ (Tafel I, 37), kuch „Geier“ (Tafel I, 34) oder das Wortzeichen KAB „Erde; Honig“ (Tafel II, 8), die vier Jahrzehnte später von dem sowjetischen Ägyptologen Juri Knorosow aufgegriffen wurden und bis heute ihre Gültigkeit besitzen.

Rosny Study

Tafel I und II aus Cyrus Thomas‘ „Are the Maya Hieroglyphs Phonetic“ (1893)

Der Kalender

Während der sprachliche Gehalt der hieroglyphischen Texte weiter lange enigmatisch blieb, wurden auf dem Gebiet der Kalenderarithmetik rasche Fortschritte erzielt. Nach Vorarbeiten von Brasseur de Bourbourg und de Rosny war es vor allem der deutsche Germanist und Bibliothekar Ernst Förstemann, der die kalendarisch-astronomischen Inhalte erschloss. Als Kustos der Dresdener Mayahandschrift veröffentlichte er 1882 eine Faksimileausgabe und erklärte bis 1893 unter anderem folgende Mechanismen darin: die lineare Tageszählung seit einem Nulldatum, den Aufbau der 260-Tages-Almanache, die Berechnung des 584-tägigen Venuszyklus und die Grundlagen zur Berechnung von Mondfinsternissen (Zusammenfassung und englische Übersetzung seiner Forschung).

1905 schließlich konnte der amerikanische Verleger John Goodman eine Korrelation der linearen Tageszählung mit dem gregorianischen Kalender vorschlagen, eine Bestätigung fand der mexikanische Forscher Juan Martínez Hernández 1926, der britische Gelehrte Eric Thompson korrigierte die Korrelation 1935 um drei Tage auf die Konstante von 584,285 Tagen, die den Nullpunkt des Mayakalenders und den des Julianischen Kalenders verbinden. Bis heute ist diese sogenannte GMT-Korrelation allgemein anerkannt.

Bis in die 1950er Jahre hinein dominierte die kalendarisch-astronomische Schule der Mayaepigraphik und kulminierte zweifelsohne in Thompsons 1950 erschienenen Werk Maya Hieroglyphic Writing, in dem detailliert ein Großteil der bekannten kalendarischen Zyklen abgehandelt wurde. Ebenso trug Thompson die formalen Funktionsweisen der Mayaschrift zusammen, die zusammen mit seinem 1962 erschienenen Katalog bis heute Standards gesetzt haben. Allerdings lehnte Thompson noch bis kurz vor seinem Tod 1975 den phonetischen Ansatz ab. Andere Fachkollegen, wie Floyd Lounsbury und David Kelley standen neuen Ideen des phonetischen Ansatzen offener gegenüber, auch wenn ihre Beiträge zum Kalender und zur Astronomie ihr eigentliches Vermächtnis sind.

Der phonetische Ansatz

Es bedurfte der komparativen Perspektive eines Ägyptologen, um dem phonetischen Entzifferungsansatz zum Durchbruch zu verhelfen. Von 1952 bis 1955 veröffentlichte der sowjetische Forscher Juri Knorosow mehrere Arbeiten zu seiner Methode. Er stellte erstens fest, dass die Mayaschrift in etwa gleich viele Zeichen aufweist wie die ägyptischen Hieroglyphen, die 1823 von Jean-François Champollion entziffert wurden und damit mehr als jede Alphabetschrift, aber weniger als rein logographische Schriften wie etwa das Chinesische. Er ging also von einem gemischten, logo-syllabischen System aus.

Seiner Meinung nach hatte Landa die syllabischen Zeichen der Struktur KV (Konsonant-Vokal) missverstanden, als Indiz nahm der die verschiedenen Zeichen für einen „Buchstaben“ und die wenigen Belege von KV-Zeichen (wie dem „CU“). Basierend auf der 1897 erschienenen Arbeit von Paul Schellhas zu den Göttergestalten in den Handschriften begann Knorosow, Bild und Text zu korrelieren und lexikalisch zu begründen. In einer Vignette des Madrider Codex erscheint die Figur eines Truthahns, der im yukatekischen Maya kutz heißt. Im zugehörigen Text erscheint Landas „CU“-Zeichen (= ku gemäß kolonialspanischer Orthographie) plus ein unbekanntes Zeichen. Basierend auf einer angenommenen Vokalharmonie mit ku postulierte Knorosow den Lautwert tzu um den auslautenden Konsonanten von kutz zu schreiben. Er testete diese Hypothese mit einem Hieroglyphenblock im Dresdener Codex, der mit dem Abbild eines Hundes, tzul auf Yukatekisch einhergeht. Während das erste Zeichen das gleiche tzu ist, musste also das zweite den syllabischen Lautwert lu haben. Tatsächlich entspricht dieses zweite Zeichen einem der beiden „L“ in Landa. Auf diese Weise konnte Knorosow weitere Silbenzeichen identifizieren.

Codex Madrid & Dresden

Vignetten 91a3 des Codex Madrid und 7a2 des Codex Dresden mit den Schreibungen ku-tzu und tzu-lu. (Original des C. Dresden, Faksimile des C. Madrid)

Mit ikonographischen Vergleichen kann Knorosow sogar Logogramme semantisch isolieren und mit yukatekischen Wörterbüchern auch sprachlich annähernd beschreiben. Er entdeckt dabei auch das Prinzip der phonetischen Komplementierung, bei dem Silbenzeichen als Lesehilfen dienen (etwa CHAN-na für chan, „Himmel“).

Allerdings war die Methode nicht unproblematisch, da Schreibungen nicht unbedingt immer synharmonisch (also KV1-KV1) sein mussten, sondern auch disharmonisch (also KV1-KV2) erscheinen konnten. Trotz kurzfristiger englischer Übersetzungen seiner Arbeiten in amerikanischen Zeitschriften blieb Knorosows Arbeit durch reale und mentale Mauern zwischen Ost und West lange vernachlässigt, insbesondere bekämpft durch Eric Thompson.

Der historische Ansatz

Einen anderen Ansatz als Knorosow verfolgte die Exilrussin Tatiana Proskouriakoff, die am Peabody Museum der Harvard University angestellt war. In einem 1960 publizierten Artikel konnte sie erstmals darlegen, dass zumindest die steinernen Monumentalinschriften historische Daten aus dem Leben von Herrschern beinhalten. Obwohl sie Knorosows Ansatz ablehnte, musste selbst Eric Thompson anerkennen, dass er mit seiner Einschätzung, die Inschriften würden nur astronomischen Inhalt hatten, falsch lag.

Anhand eines Stelenprogramms in der Fundstätte Piedras Negras, welches verschiedene Herrscher porträtiert, arbeitete Proskouriakoff ein Datumsmuster mit zwei Schlüsselhieroglyphen heraus. Anhand einer Seriation konnte sie zeigen, dass die erste Hieroglyphe immer die früheste ist, die mit einem Herrscher assoziiert ist, während die zweite jeweils immer 10-30 Jahre später liegt, aber immer nach dem letzten Datum des vorangegangen Herrschers. Sie schloss korrekt, dass diese beiden Ausdrücke Geburt und Inthronisation bezeichnen, auch wenn eine sprachliche Lesung noch nicht gegeben war.

In weiteren Arbeiten konnte Proskouriakoff den historischen Ansatz weiter präzisieren, unterstützt durch die Arbeiten anderer Forscher. So konnte der Deutschmexikaner Heinrich Berlin 1958 darlegen, dass die Namensphrase eines Herrschers immer von einer Hieroglyphe von fixer Struktur mit einem variablen Element gefolgt wurde, das von Ort zu Ort variiert. Er nannte dies „Emblemhieroglyphe“ und sah darin den Namen des jeweiligen Stadtstaats und ein Hilfsmittel zur Rekonstruktion politischer Organisation.

Die Früchte einer neuen Generation

Nachdem Knorosows Arbeiten im Westen bekannt geworden waren, studierten gleichzeitig einige junge Studenten und Doktoranden an der Harvard University, an der auch Proskouriakoff angestellt war. Dieser Nachwuchs, unter ihnen David Kelley und Michael Coe, war den neuen Entwicklungen gegenüber sehr offen. Inbesondere Kelley wand den phonetischen Ansatz erstmals auf die Steininschriften an und konnte erfolgreich neue Zeichen sprachlich entziffern, eine Arbeit die 1976 im Werk Deciphering the Maya Script kulminierte und ein allgemeines Umdenken einleitete.

Ein zweiter Zündfunke für die Weiterentwicklung der Mayaschriftforschung war die erste Mesa Redonda in Palenque in 1973, organisiert von der Kunstlehrerin Merle Greene Robertson, die bereits seit einigen Jahren in der nahegelegenen Ruinenstätte gleichen Namens Inschriften dokumentierte. Hier diskutierten zum ersten Mal Archäologen, Epigraphiker, Kunsthistoriker und begeisterte Laien zusammen. Neben Floyd Lounsbury, der als Mathematiker und Linguistik bedeutende Arbeiten zur Mythologie von Palenque beisteuerte, aber auch zwei Jahre zuvor Berlins Emblemhieroglyphen sprachlich entziffern konnte, nahmen noch die Grafikerin Linda Schele und statt David Kelley sein Student Peter Mathews teil. Ihr nachhaltiger Beitrag bestand darin, die Dynastiegeschichte von Palenque aufgearbeitet zu haben, die Lebensdaten und Namen von sechs aufeinanderfolgenden Herrschern – innerhalb eines Nachmittages. Wenig später konnte diese Gruppe in Washington die frühe Geschichte Palenques zurück ins Licht holen.

Diese Arbeiten lieferten nicht nur neue biographische Ausdrücke, welche die beiden „Ereignishieroglyphen“ von Proskouriakoff ergänzten, sondern auch Verwandschaftsausdrücke und vieles mehr. Gleichzeitig konnte menschliche Geschichte in die der Götter eingebettet werden, wie in nachfolgenden Mesas Redondas dargelegt. Viel wichtiger aber war die Erkenntnis, dass Texte ganzheitlich analysiert werden mussten und damit erste Schritte zur Rhetorik, Syntax und Morphologie des Klassischen Maya getan wurden. Ab 1978 fanden neueste Erkenntnisse der Mayaschrift durch die jährlichen von Linda Schele initiierten Maya Meetings eine weitere Verbreitung in Fachkreisen.

Die Entzifferung der Mayaschrift kam ab den späten 1970er Jahren mit großen Schritten voran. Ein weiterer Meilenstein war 1979 die Tagung Phoneticism in Maya Hieroglyphic Writing in Albany, die Epigraphiker unter Federführung von Linguisten vereinte. Hier wurden erstmals Methoden der historischen und komparativen Linguistik und Graphematik auf die Mayaschrift angewandt. Eines der Ergebnisse der Tagung war erstmals ein Raster der KV-Silbenzeichen, das bis heute erweitert wird. Mit der gleichen Methode wie einst Knorosow konnte etwa David Stuart 1987 das Syllabar gleich um zehn Zeichen und dessen Varianten erweitern.

Die Epigraphik der Moderne

Heute ist ein guter Teil der Mayaschrift lesbar, laufende Entzifferungen lassen nicht nur unser Textverständnis anwachsen, sondern ermöglichen uns auch tiefere Einblicke in die Kultur der klassischen Maya. Auch wenn es nach wie vor wichtig ist, den Lautwert von Zeichen zu erschließen, hat sich der Fokus der Epigraphik verlagert und weiterentwickelt.

Ein verbessertes Verständnis von Schrift und Sprache ermöglicht tiefere Einsichten hinsichtlich der Sprachentwicklung und -geographie, orthographischen Mechanismen und zugrunde liegenden kognitiven Prozessen und damit auch phonologischen Charakteristika der geschriebenen Sprache. Wie verschiedene Arbeiten von Forschern wie Nikolai Grube, Stephen Houston, Alfonso Lacadena, John Robertson, David Stuart oder Søren Wichmann gezeigt haben, ist das „Klassische Maya“ kein monolithischer Block. Besonders die Studien The Language of Classic Maya Inscriptions und Quality and Quantity in Glyphic Nouns and Adjectives von Anfang der 2000er Jahre, sowie der Sammelband The Linguistics of Maya Writing haben wegweisende Erkenntnisse geliefert und den Weg für die weitere Forschung bereit.

In ihrem über 1500-jährigen Verwendungszeitraum hat die Mayaschrift neue Zeichen hervorgebracht, während alte außer Gebrauch gerieten. Die Schriftsprache war Veränderungen aus den gesprochenen Sprachen unterworfen, die sich mittlerweile auch besser zeitlich und genetisch zuordnen lassen. Die Datierung vieler Inschriften ist dabei von größtem Wert. Epigraphischer und linguistischer Erkenntnisgewinn sind dabei rückgekoppelt und bringen sich gegenseitig vorwärts. Viele Fragestellungen, vor allem im Detail bleiben aber nach wie vor problematisch oder sind noch ungelöst, manche werden vielleicht nie beantwortet werden können.

Seiner Zeit weit voraus schrieb Cyrus Thomas 1892: „Is the Maya writing phonetic? […] This statement I firmly believe I can maintain […].“ Mit jedem neuen Forschungsergebnis kann diese Aussage weiter unterstrichen werden.

Fragestellungen

Neben den allgemeinen Problemfeldern können eine Reihe von forschungsspezifischen Fragestellungen entwickelt werden. Diese beziehen sich nicht nur primär auf die Grammatologie und Linguistik der Hieroglyphenschrift. Wichtig sind komparative Perspektiven zu anderen Schriftsystemen, aber auch ein interdisziplinärer Ansatz unter Einbeziehung der Psycho- und Soziolinguistik, sowie quantitativer Methoden und Typologie.

Schrifttypologie

Ein widerspruchsfreies Verständnis der Natur und Funktionsweise eines Schriftsystems ist der Schlüssel für jede Forschungsfrage innerhalb der Epigraphik. Die neuere Forschung hat die Typologie von Schriftsystemen durch Komparatistik wesentlich feinkörniger herausarbeiten können. Der Ansatz einer komparativen Graphematik in der Mayaepigraphik ist nicht neu, aber anstatt andere Schriftsysteme ausschließlich zur argumentativen Unterstützung heranzuziehen, ist eine differenziertere Herangehensweise von Vorteil. Zum Beispiel sind Homophonie und Determinative im Maya, im Ägyptischen und der Keilschrift graphematisch unterschiedlich realisiert, da alle drei verschiedene Ausprägungen eines grundsätzlich logo-syllabischen Schriftsystems sind. Eine kontrastierende Perspektive aller drei Systeme führt also zu einem klareren Verständnis der Gemeinsamkeiten wie auch der Unterschiede und damit zu einer präziseren Typologie.

Zeicheneigenschaften

Keine Schrifttypologie kann ohne eine genaue Definition des graphemischen Lexikons, also der funktionalen Zeicheneigenschaften, hergeleitet werden. Während die Dichotomie zwischen pleremischen („inhaltlichen“, also logographischen) und kenemischen („lautlichen“, also syllabischen) Zeichen außer Frage steht, sind einige Probleme noch ungelöst. Hierbei steht die Frage im Raum, ob noch weitere Zeichenklassen existieren, wie sie etwa mit den Morphosilben (Silbenzeichen mit bedeutungstragender Funktion) oder semantischen Klassifikatoren (zur Anzeige von semantischen Domänen) vorgeschlagen wurden. Die Zeicheneigenschaften sind ebenfalls eng mit der Orthographie verbunden und unterstützen damit die Versuche des Epigraphikers, die Lesefolge einer Zeichenkette zu rekonstruieren. Unter Berücksichtigung des mentalen Lexikons muss also auch die orthographische Tiefe der Mayaschrift geklärt werden und inwieweit die Zeichenverwendungen mitunter konvergieren.

Harmonieregeln

Die Frage der orthographischen Tiefe betrifft nicht nur das graphemische Lexikon und Phänomene wie Zeichenellipsen oder -metathesen, sondern auch die viel debattierten Mechanismen ob und wie Vokalquantitäten durch harmonische und disharmonische Schreibungen indiziert sind. Dabei ist aber auch noch nicht abschließend geklärt, ob das Vokalsystem das Klassische Maya ein quantitatives (also mit bedeutungsunterscheidender Funktion) oder ein qualitatives (durch Betonung und Silbenlänge ohne Bedeutungskontrast) war. Noch weniger sind die exakten „Regeln“ bekannt. Die beiden wichtigsten Modelle hierzu schließen sich gegenseitig aus. Auch ist die Datengrundlage für die Formulierung der Modelle nie vollständig publiziert worden. So ist unbekannt, wie viele Schreibungen jeweils für ein Lexem analysiert wurden. Insbesondere wurde nie umfassend geklärt, inwieweit die Harmonieregeln an Morphemgrenzen gelten oder ausgesetzt werden.

Sprachaffiliation

Der Vorschlag eines „Klassischen Ch’olti’an“ als eine statische lingua franca im höfischen Kontext hat einen gewissen Reiz, wenn man sie mit dem fossilierten Mittelägyptisch als der sakralen Sprache des Neuen Reichs vergleicht. Damit wäre sie eine vernakulare Schriftsprache in einer echten Diglossiesituation. Ähnlich war die Stellung des klassischen, ciceronischen Lateins als die Hochsprache des Römischen Reiches und später im europäischen Geisteswesen. Diese Sicht ist ebenso wie die genetische Anbindung problematisch und klärt nicht die immer deutlicher werdende Sichtbarkeit von Vernakulareinflüssen in der Schrift. Wie die epigraphischen Daten zeigen, war die Sprachsituation deutlich komplexer und diversifizierter und weit weg von einer einheitlichen Hochsprache, insbesondere in weniger formalen Diskurssituationen und Textgenres. Neuere Daten zeigen in den Texten tatsächlich Übereinstimmungen mit der Sprachentwicklung aus dem Proto-Ch’olan, wie sie vor über 20 Jahren von der historischen Linguistik rekonstruiert wurde. Das Vorhandensein von Diglossie und vernakularen Einflüssen hat nicht zuletzt wiederum Einfluss auf die Schreibpraktiken und die orthographische Tiefe.

Kooperationspartner

Staats- und Universitätsbibliothek Göttingen / TextGrid

Zur Erstellung, Verwaltung und Speicherung der textuellen und graphischen Korpusdaten wird die virtuelle Forschungsumgebung TextGrid eingesetzt, die ein vernetztes, kollaboratives Arbeiten ermöglicht und sprachwissenschaftliche und korpuslinguistische Informationstechnologien bietet, welche für die Textanalyse und Erstellung des Wörterbuchs des Klassischen Maya hilfreich sind. Die graphischen Korpusdaten werden ebenfalls in TextGrid abgelegt und mit Metadaten versehen. Um auf die besonderen Anforderungen des Projekts einzugehen, sind umfangreiche Anpassungen und Erweiterungen der virtuellen Forschungsumgebung geplant. Um diese optimal in die bestehende Infrastruktur von TextGrid einzubetten, wurde eine Kooperation mit der Staats- und Universitätsbibliothek Göttingen eingegangen.

Universitäts- und Landesbibliothek Bonn

Für die Präsentation im Internet besteht eine Zusammenarbeit mit der Universitäts- und Landesbibliothek Bonn (ULB), die das virtuelle Inschriftenarchiv des TWKM über die Plattform Visual Library in ihre Digitalen Sammlungen integrieren und die Textträger in Form von Digitalisaten mit Angabe der Metadaten, epigraphischen Analysen und Übersetzungen veröffentlichen wird. Die Einbindung der ULB als Kooperationspartner garantiert, dass die digitalen Datenbestände des TWKM-Inschriftenarchivs auch nach Projektende der Wissenschaft und Öffentlichkeit nachhaltig zur freien Recherche zur Verfügung stehen werden.

Inschriftenarchive

Die datenbanktechnische Erschließung aller Maya-Textträger bildet die Arbeitsgrundlage für das Projekt und alle damit verbundenen Forschungsziele. Zu diesem Zweck wird ein digitales und physisches Archiv sämtlicher Inschriftenträger in der Arbeitsstelle eingerichtet, das neben Abbildungen in Form von Photographien und Zeichnungen auch die Beschreibungsdaten der Inschriftenträger enthält. Hierfür haben Prof. em. Dr. Berthold Riese (Universität Bonn) sowie Prof. Karl Herbert Mayer und Univ. Doz. Hasso Hohmann (Interdisziplinäre Arbeitsgruppe Mayaforschung, Graz) ihre Archive dem Projekt zur Verfügung gestellt.

Auszeichnungsstandards

Für die textuellen Forschungsdaten wird das Daten- und Auszeichnungsformat TEI (Text Encoding Initiative) verwendet, das sich als internationaler Standard für XML-basierte Formate und Anwendungen in den Sprachwissenschaften durchgesetzt hat. Hierfür steht dem Projekt Dr. Thomas Kollatz (Salomon Ludwig Steinheim-Institut, Essen) als Berater zur Verfügung.

Wissenschaftlicher Beirat

Die Arbeit des Projektes wird von einem vierköpfigen wissenschaftlichen Beirat beraten und evaluiert, der an Projektkonferenzen teilnimmt und in wichtige wissenschaftliche Diskussionen einbezogen wird. Damit soll sichergestellt werden, dass die im Rahmen des Projekts definierten Konventionen in Bezug auf die Transkription der Quellen, die Analyse und Präsentation der Daten in Abstimmung mit der weiteren Fachöffentlichkeit entwickelt werden.

Prof. em. Dr. Peter Mathews La Trobe University, Melbourne
Prof. Dr. David Stuart University of Texas, Austin
Prof. Dr. Gordon Whittaker Georg-August Universität, Göttingen
Dr. Marc Uwe Zender Tulane University, New Orleans

Sven Gronemeyer

personal_gronemeyer

Lebenslauf

Ab 1998 Studium der Altamerikanistik und Ethnologie, Vor- und Frühgeschichte und Ägyptologie an der Rheinischen Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn. 2004 Magister mit einer epigraphischen Studie der Inschriften von Tortuguero, Mexiko. Von 2011 bis 2014 Promotionsstipendiat an der La Trobe University Melbourne, Australien. 2015 Promotion mit einer Arbeit über die orthographischen Konventionen der Mayaschrift und die phonemische Rekonstruktion des Klassischen Maya. Von 2010 bis 2012 Mitarbeiter im Proyecto Arqueológico Tamarindito. Von 2014 bis 2016 Vizepräsident von Wayeb (European Association of Mayanists). Honorary Associate der La Trobe University seit 2015. Preisträger 2015 der Nancy Millis Medal.

Interessengebiete

Die Kultur der klassischen Maya. Epigraphisch interessieren vorrangig historiographische Aspekte und Systeme der politischen und territorialen Organisation, sowie typologische Untersuchungen des Schriftsystems. Linguistisch liegen die Schwerpunkte auf komparativen und quantitativen Methoden einer historischen Linguistik des Klassischen Maya, insbesondere in den Bereichen Phonologie und Morphologie.

Publikationen (Auswahl)

Gronemeyer, Sven

  • 2016 The Linguistics of Toponymy in Maya Hieroglyphic Writing. In: Places of Power and Memory in Mesoamerica‘s Past and Present: How Sites, Toponyms and Landscapes Shape History and Remembrance [Estudios Indiana, 9], herausgegeben von Daniel Graña-Behrens: 85-122. Berlin: Ibero-Amerikanisches Institut – Preußischer Kulturbesitz & Gebr. Mann Verlag.
  • 2016 Textos jeroglíficos de Tamarindito. In: Entre reyes y campesinos: investigaciones recientes en la antigua capital maya de Tamarindito [Paris Monographs in American Archaeology, 45], herausgegeben von Markus Eberl und Claudia Vela González: 107-122. Oxford: Archaeopress.
  • 2015 Class Struggle: Towards a Better Understanding of Maya Writing Using Comparative Graphematics. In: On Methods: How We Know what We Think We Know about the Maya [Acta Mesoamericana, 28], herausgegeben von Harri Kettunen and Christophe Helmke: 101-117. Markt Schwaben: Verlag Anton Saurwein.
  • 2014 E pluribus unum: Embracing Vernacular Influences in a Classic Mayan Scribal Tradition. In: A Celebration of the Life and Work of Pierre Robert Colas [Acta Mesoamericana, 27], herausgegeben von Christophe Helmke und Frauke Sachse: 147-162. Markt Schwaben: Verlag Anton Saurwein.
  • 2013 The Monuments and Inscriptions of Tamarindito, Petén, Guatemala (Acta Mesoamericana, 25). Markt Schwaben: Verlag Anton Saurwein.
  • 2012 Statements of Identity: Emblem Glyphs in the Nexus of Political Relations. In: Proceedings of the 14th European Maya Conference: Maya Political Relations and Strategies [Contributions in New World Archaeology, 4], herausgegeben von Jarosław Źrałka, Wiesław Koszkul und Beata Golińska: 13-40. Krakau: Polska Akademia Umiejętności und Uniwersytet Jagielloński.
  • 2011 Evoking the Dualism of Sign Classes: A Critique on the Existence of Morphosyllabic Signs in Maya Hieroglyphic Writing. Indiana 28: 315-337.
  • 2010 A Painted Ceramic Vessel from San Miguel Tayasal, El Petén, Guatemala. Mexicon XXXII(6): 145-147.
  • 2006 The Maya Site of Tortuguero, Tabasco, Mexico. Its History and Inscriptions (Acta Mesoamericana, 17). Markt Schwaben: Verlag Anton Saurwein.
  • 2006 Glyphs G and F: Identified as Aspects of the Maize God. Wayeb Notes 22.
  • 2004 A Preliminary Ruling Sequence of Cobá, Quintana Roo. Wayeb Notes 14.
  • 2003 Bloodletting and Vision Quest among the Ancient Maya: A Medical and Iconographic Re-evalution. Human Mosaic 34 (1-2): 5-14.
  • 2003 Beobachtungen zur possessiven Morphologie von Glyphe F. Wayeb Notes 1.

Gronemeyer, Sven & Markus Eberl

  • 2012 Recent Archaeological and Epigraphic Investigations in Tamarindito, Petén. In: Proceedings of the 1st Cracow Maya Conference: Archaeology and Epigraphy of the Eastern Central Maya Lowlands [Contributions in New World Archaeology, 3], herausgegeben von Christophe Helmke, Jarosław Źrałka und Monika Banach: 65-89. Krakau: Polska Akademia Umiejętności und Uniwersytet Jagielloński.

Gronemeyer, Sven & Barbara MacLeod

  • 2010 What Could Happen in 2012: A Re-Analysis of the 13-Bak’tun Prophecy on Tortuguero Monument 6. Wayeb Notes 34.

Benavides Castillo, Antonio & Sven Gronemeyer

  • 2005 A Ballgame Stone Ring Fragment from Edzna, Campeche. Mexicon XXVII(6): 107-108.

Eberl, Markus & Sven Gronemeyer

  • 2016 Organización política y social. In: Entre reyes y campesinos: investigaciones recientes en la antigua capital maya de Tamarindito [Paris Monographs in American Archaeology, 45], herausgegeben von Markus Eberl und Claudia Vela González: 137-146. Oxford: Archaeopress.

Eberl, Markus, Claudia Vela González & Sven Gronemeyer

  • 2011 Investigaciones recientes del proyecto Tamarindito: la temporada 2010. In: XXIV Simposio de investigaciones arqueológicas en Guatemala, 2010, herausgegeben von Bárbara Arroyo, Lorena Paiz Aragón, Adriana Linares Palma und Ana Lucia Arroyave: 237-246. Guatemala-Stadt: Instituto de Antropología e Historia, Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes und Asociación Tikal.

Vela González, Claudia, Sarah Levithol, Andrea Díaz, Sven Gronemeyer & Markus Eberl

  • 2016 Excavaciones extensivas. In: Entre reyes y campesinos: investigaciones recientes en la antigua capital maya de Tamarindito [Paris Monographs in American Archaeology, 45], herausgegeben von Markus Eberl und Claudia Vela González: 79-106. Oxford: Archaeopress.

Vela González, Claudia, Sarah Levithol, Laura Velásquez, Andrea Díaz, Juan Manuel Palomo, Sven Gronemeyer & Markus Eberl

  • 2016 Excavaciones de pozos de sondeo. In: Entre reyes y campesinos: investigaciones recientes en la antigua capital maya de Tamarindito [Paris Monographs in American Archaeology, 45], herausgegeben von Markus Eberl und Claudia Vela González: 21-77. Oxford: Archaeopress.

Links

Ein Maya-Wörterbuch aus Bonn

Westdeutsche Allgemeine Zeitung

Forscher der Universität Bonn wollen in einem 15 Jahre dauernden Projekt die Hieroglyphen der Maya erforschen und ein „Wörterbuch des Klassischen Maya erstellen“. Eine ziemliche Sisyphos-Arbeit. Denn um das Ziel zu erreichen, will ein zehnköpfiges Wissenschaftlerteam rund 10 000 Inschriften aus der Zeit von 250 v. Chr. bis 900 n. Chr. in den nächsten Jahren erschließen und digitalisieren, wie der Leiter des Projekts Nikolai Grube sagt.

mehr …

Deciphering the Maya Code

Deutschland.de

Researchers in Bonn are busy compiling a dictionary and a text database on the Maya culture of the Classic period. The project will run for 15 years. It is attached to the Dept. for Greek and Latin Philology, the Dept. of Romance Studies and the Dept. for the Anthropology of the Americas at the University of Bonn. The project is headed by Professor Nikolai Grube, a renowned international expert on research on the Mayas and a member of the North Rhine-Westphalian Academy of Sciences, Humanities and the Arts.

mehr …

Der Maya-Code wird ausgerechnet in Bonn geknackt

Hamburger Abendblatt

Wenn die Maya heute wissen wollen, wie ihre Vorfahren geschrieben und gesprochen haben, dann fragen sie in Bonn nach. Denn am Rhein entsteht das erste Wörterbuch der altamerikanischen Zivilisation.

Der 12. Juli des Jahres 1561 war der Tag, an dem das kulturelle Gedächtnis eines Volkes verglühen sollte. Diego de Landa, der von den spanischen Eroberern eingesetzte Bischof und Inquisitor der Halbinsel Yukatan die heute zu Mexiko, Guatemala und Belize gehört), ließ auf dem Platz vor dem Konvent des Franziskaner-Mönchsordens in dem Dorf Maní einen riesigen Scheiterhaufen aufschichten, der von Kreuzen eingerahmt wurde.

mehr …

Trabajan en Alemania en el primer diccionario jeroglífico maya

Deutsche Welle

Los mayas dejaron como testimonio conocimientos matemáticos, pirámides y unos 15.000 jeroglíficos, en los que trabajan investigadores de Bonn para conformar el primer diccionario maya.

Investigadores de la Universidad de Bonn comenzaron un proyecto de quince años de duración que descifrará los jeroglíficos mayas y su evolución durante más de mil años para conformar el primer diccionario maya. El equipo bajo la dirección del epigrafista alemán Nikolai Grube digitalizará todos los textos jeroglíficos y ‘lexemas‘ para construir un archivo completo de todas las inscripciones. A través de un software diseñado en colaboración con científicos de la Universidad de Göttingen, serán analizadas las concordancias de las palabras mayas en los distintos textos disponibles. El resultado estará disponible para todos los interesados en esta cultura a través de una página web. La cultura maya existió desde el 2000 a.C. hasta la conquista, sin embargo el auge, de donde surgieron la mayor parte de los textos jeroglíficos, fue entre el 250 y 900 d.C.

mehr …

Der geheime Code hinter den 800 Schriftzeichen

Sächsische Zeitung

Bonner Forscher arbeiten an einem Maya-Wörterbuch. Doch jetzt müssen sie erkennen, dass es auch noch Dialekte gibt.

Die Maya bauten gigantische Pyramiden, waren Meister im Rechnen, und sie hinterließen rund 800 rätselhafte Schriftzeichen. Deren Entzifferung dauert nun bereits fünf Jahrhunderte. Forscher der Universität Bonn wollen nun in einem 15 Jahre dauernden Projekt die Hieroglyphen der Maya neu erforschen und ein komplettes „Wörterbuch des Klassischen Maya“ erstellen.

mehr …

Rätselhafte Maya-Hieroglyphen

Handelsblatt

Neben beeindruckenden Ruinen haben die Maya uns auch 800 Schriftzeichen hinterlassen. Nur ein Teil konnte bislang entziffert werden. Forscher wollen die Hieroglyphen nun entschlüsseln – eine Sisyphos-Arbeit.

Düsseldorf. Die Maya bauten gigantische Pyramiden, waren Meister im Rechnen – und sie hinterließen rund 800 rätselhafte Schriftzeichen. Jetzt wollen Forscher der Universität Bonn die Hieroglyphen der Maya erforschen und ein „Wörterbuch des Klassischen Maya erstellen“. Auf 15 Jahre ist das Forschungsprojekt terminiert.

mehr …

Mit Wörterbuch die Maya-Sprache erwecken

20 Minuten

Die Maya bauten gigantische Pyramiden, waren Meister im Rechnen und hinterliessen 800 rätselhafte Schriftzeichen. Forscher wollen diese untersuchen und ein Wörterbuch erstellen.

Ein «Wörterbuch des Klassischen Maya» möchte ein deutsches Forscherteam produzieren. Um das Ziel zu erreichen, will es rund 10’000 Inschriften aus der Zeit von 250 v. Chr. bis 900 n. Chr. erschliessen und digitalisieren, wie Projektleiter Nikolai Grube von der Universität Bonn am Mittwoch bekannt gab.

mehr …

Geld für Merowinger und Maya

Rheinische Post

Die NRW-Akademie unterstützt zwei Forschungsprojekte für 15 Jahre

Wie funktionieren soziale Systeme? Wie organisieren sich die Menschen in Schrift und Sprache? Fragen, die hinter zwei Forschungsprojekten stehen, die in den nächsten Jahren in Köln und Bonn aufwändige Recherche und Edition verlangen. Dank der Förderung der NRW-Akademie der Wissenschaften und der Künste können die Mitarbeiter bis 2029 ihrer Forschung nachgehen. Der „Edition der fränkischen Herrscherklasse“ widmet sich das Kölner Team unter der Leitung von Karl Ubl, an „Textdatenbank und Wörterbuch des klassischen Maya“ arbeitet in Bonn eine Gruppe von Wissenschaftlern im Team von Nikolai Grube.

mehr …

Investigadores alemanes buscan crear un diccionario de maya clásico

La Prensa Gráfica

Para descodificar los jeroglíficos los expertos analizarán y digitalizarán cerca de 10,000 inscripiciones de la época

Los mayas construyeron pirámides gigantes, fueron maestros del cálculo y dejaron tras de sí cerca de 800 misteriosos caracteres. Ahora un equipo de diez investigadores de la Universidad de Bonn busca desentrañarlo y crear un diccionario de maya clásico. Sólo una parte ha sido descifrada hasta el momento.

mehr …

Hieroglyphen-Arbeit

Die Welt

Bonner Forscher wollen Maya-Zeichenbuch erstellen

Rund 800 Schriftzeichen hatten die Maya. Nur ein Teil wurde bislang entziffert. Forscher aus Nordrhein-Westfalen wollen die Hieroglyphen nun entschlüsseln. Das kann viele Jahre dauern. Die Maya bauten gigantische Pyramiden, waren Meister im Rechnen, und sie hinterließen rund 800 rätselhafte Schriftzeichen. Forscher der Universität Bonn wollen in einem 15 Jahre dauernden Projekt die Hieroglyphen der Maya erforschen und ein „Wörterbuch des Klassischen Maya erstellen“.

mehr …

Bonner Forscher wollen Maya-Wörterbuch erstellen

Focus

Die Maya bauten gigantische Pyramiden, waren Meister im Rechnen, und sie hinterließen rund 800 rätselhafte Schriftzeichen. Forscher der Universität Bonn wollen in einem 15 Jahre dauernden Projekt die Hieroglyphen der Maya erforschen und ein „Wörterbuch des Klassischen Maya erstellen“.

Das ist eine ziemliche Sisyphos-Arbeit. Denn um das Ziel zu erreichen, will ein zehnköpfiges Forscherteam rund 10 000 Inschriften aus der Zeit von 250 v. Chr. bis 900 n. Chr. in den nächsten Jahren erschließen und digitalisieren, wie der Leiter des Projekts, Professor Nikolai Grube, am Mittwoch in Düsseldorf sagte. Darauf basierend soll dann das Wörterbuch als Datenbank und in gedruckter Form erstellt werden. Es soll den gesamten Sprachschatz der Maya abbilden. „Der Schlüssel für die Schrift muss noch gefunden werden, um einen Einblick in die alte indianische Kultur vor der Ankunft der europäischen Eroberer zu bekommen“, sagte Grube.

Investigadores buscan crear un diccionario de cultura Maya

Vanguardia / La Jornada

„Todavía hay que encontrar la clave de esta escritura para tener una visión de esa cultura antes de la llegada de los conquistadores europeos“, indicó el profesor Nikolai Grube.

Düsseldorf.- Los mayas construyeron pirámides gigantes, fueron maestros del cálculo y dejaron tras de sí cerca de 800 misteriosos caracteres. Ahora un equipo de diez investigadores de la Universidad de Bonn busca desentrañarlo y crear un diccionario de maya clásico.

mehr …

Forscher planen umfassendes Wörterbuch der klassischen Maya-Sprache

Der Standard

Sämtliche bekannten Texte in Hieroglyphenschrift der Maya sollen dafür erschlossen werden.

Göttingen – Schrift und Sprache der klassischen Mayakultur sind Gegenstand eines neuen Langzeitforschungsprojekts der Nordrhein-Westfälischen Akademie der Wissenschaften und Künste (AWK-NRW). Ein umfangreiches Forscherteam soll in den kommenden 15 Jahren sämtliche Texte der Hieroglyphenschrift der Maya zwischen 500 v. u. Z. und 1500 n. u. Z. erschließen und auf dieser Grundlage ein umfassendes Wörterbuch der klassischen Mayasprache erstellen. Finanziert wird das Vorhaben mit rund 5,4 Millionen Euro von der AWK-NRW.

mehr …

Langzeitforschung: Schrift und Sprache der Mayakultur

SUB Göttingen

Universitätsbibliothek Göttingen ist Partner in neuem Projekt – Gesamtlaufzeit von 15 Jahren

Die Schrift und Sprache der klassischen Mayakultur sind der Gegenstand eines neuen Langzeitforschungsprojekts der Nordrhein-Westfälischen Akademie der Wissenschaften und der Künste mit Beteiligung der Niedersächsischen Staats- und Universitätsbibliothek Göttingen (SUB). Die Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler wollen in den kommenden 15 Jahren zunächst sämtliche Texte der Hieroglyphenschrift der Maya zwischen 500 vor Christus und 1500 nach Christus erschließen.

mehr …

Erstes Gesamt-Wörterbuch der Maya-Sprache

Börsenblatt

Großprojekt der Universität Bonn

Jahrhundertelang galten die Schriftzeichen als unentschlüsselbar: In den nächsten 15 Jahren wird die Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität in Bonn das erste Gesamt-Wörterbuch der klassischen Maya-Sprache herausgeben, inklusive einer Online-Datenbank aller Hieroglyphentexte. Die Printversion des „Wörterbuchs des klassischen Maya“ soll drei Bände umfassen.

mehr …

Aus dem Regenwald in den Computer

Universität Bonn

An der Universität Bonn entsteht ab 2014 eine Online-Datenbank für Sprache und Schrift der Maya-Kultur

Die Universität Bonn festigt ihre Position als weltweit führendes Zentrum für Sprache und Schrift der Maya-Kultur. Prof. Dr. Nikolai Grube von der Abteilung für Altamerikanistik und sein Team beginnen ein neues Großprojekt ihrer Disziplin: eine umfassende Gesamtdarstellung der klassischen Maya-Sprache samt Online-Datenbank aller Hieroglypheninschriften. Die Nordrhein-Westfälische Akademie der Wissenschaften und Künste unterstützt das 15-Jahres-Projekt mit 5,4 Millionen Euro.

mehr …

Über 12 Millionen Euro für Düsseldorfer Forscher

Aachener Zeitung

DÜSSELDORF. Mit mehr als 12 Millionen Euro fördert die Union der deutschen Akademien der Wissenschaften zwei Forschungsprojekte in NRW. Ab 2014 unterstützt die Union die Arbeit des Bonner Professors Nikolai Grube an einem Wörterbuch der alten Maya-Sprache und des Kölner Professors Karl Ubl an der Edition fränkischer Herrschererlasse aus dem Frühmittelalter, teilte die Akademieunion am Dienstag mit.

mehr …

Über 12 Millionen Euro für Düsseldorfer Forscher

Kölner Stadt-Anzeiger

Düsseldorf. Mit mehr als 12 Millionen Euro fördert die Union der deutschen Akademien der Wissenschaften zwei Forschungsprojekte in NRW. Ab 2014 unterstützt die Union die Arbeit des Bonner Professors Nikolai Grube an einem Wörterbuch der alten Maya-Sprache und des Kölner Professors Karl Ubl an der Edition fränkischer Herrschererlasse aus dem Frühmittelalter, teilte die Akademieunion am Dienstag mit.

mehr …

s